The political superstorm that devastated New York

Satellite View of Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy ...

Satellite View of Post-Tropical Cyclone Sandy on Oct. 30 (Photo credit: NASA Goddard Photo and Video)

Incompetence, stupidity, diversion, blame shifting, and false solutions to imaginary problems

Guest post by Paul Driessen

“Superstorm” Sandy killed more than 100 people, destroyed thousands of homes and businesses, and left millions without food, water, electricity, sanitation or shelter for days or even weeks. Our thoughts and prayers remain focused on its victims, many of whom are still grieving as they struggle with the storm’s wintry aftermath and try to rebuild their lives.

Unfortunately, too many politicians continue to use the storm to advance agendas, deflect blame for incompetence and mistakes, and obfuscate and magnify future risks from building and development projects that they have designed, promoted, permitted and profited from.

Sandy was “unprecedented,” the result of “weather on steroids,” various “experts” insist. “It’s global warming, stupid,” intoned Bloomberg BusinessWeek. “Anyone who says there is not a change in weather patterns is denying reality,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo declared. We must protect the great NY metropolis from rising oceans, said the Washington Post. This storm should “compel all elected leaders to take immediate action” on climate change, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg pronounced.

Unfortunately for the politicians and spin-meisters, the facts do not support this obscene posturing.

North America’s northeastern coast has been battered by hurricanes and other major storms throughout history. A 1775 hurricane killed 4,000 people in Newfoundland; an 1873 monster left 600 dead in Nova Scotia; others pummeled Canada’s Maritime Provinces in 1866, 1886, 1893, 1939, 1959, 1963 and 2003.

Manhattan got pounded in 1667 and by the Great Storm of 1693. They were followed by more behemoths in 1788, 1821, 1893, 1944, 1954 and 1992. Other “confluences of severe weather events” brought killer storms like the four-day Great Blizzard of 1888. The 1893 storm largely eradicated Hog Island, and the 1938 “Long Island Express” hit LI as a category 3 hurricane with wind gusts up to 180 mph.

Experts say such winds today would rip windows from skyscrapers and cause a deadly blizzard of flying glass, masonry, chairs, desks and other debris from high-rise offices and apartments. People would seek safety in subway tunnels, where they would drown as the tunnels flood.

Sandy was merely the latest “confluence” (tropical storm, northeaster and full-moon high tide) to blast the New York-New Jersey area. It was never a matter of if, but only of when, such a storm would hit.

People, planners and politicians should have been better prepared. Instead, we are feted with statements designed to dodge responsibility and culpability, by trying to blame global warming. The reality is, even as atmospheric carbon dioxide levels rose to 391 ppm (0.0391%) today, average global temperatures have not changed in 16 years, and sea levels are rising no faster than in 1900. Even with Hurricane Sandy, November 2012 marked the quietest long-term hurricane period since the Civil War, with only one major hurricane strike on the US mainland in seven years. This is global warming and unprecedented weather on steroids?

In Hurricane Sandy’s aftermath – with millions freezing hungry in dark devastation – Mayor Bloomberg sidetracked police and sanitation workers for the NYC Marathon, until public outrage forced him to reconsider. While federal emergency teams struggled to get water, food and gasoline to victims, companies, religious groups, charities, local citizens and New Jersey Governor Chris Christie worked tirelessly to raise money and organize countless relief efforts.

Most outrageous of all, though, was how ill-prepared the region was for another major storm – and how many political decisions had virtually ensured that any repeat of the 1893, 1938, 1944 and other storms would bring devastation far worse than would likely have occurred in the absence of those decisions.

In one of the most obvious, architects, city planners, mayors and governors alike thought nothing of placing generators in the basements of hospitals and skyscrapers built in areas that are barely above sea level. Past storms have brought surges12 to 18 feet high onto Long Island, and studies have warned that a category 3 direct hit could put much of New York City and its key infrastructure under 30 feet of water. Sandy’s 9-foot surges (plus five feet of high tide) flooded those basements, rendering generators useless, and leaving buildings cold and dark. Perhaps if Mayor Bloomberg had worried less about 32-oz sodas and seas that are rising a mere foot per century, he could have devoted more time to critical issues.

The mayor has also obsessed about urban sprawl. However, when new developments mean high rents, high taxes and photo-op ground breakings, he has a different philosophy.

Mr. Bloomberg’s Arverne by the Sea initiative transformed what he called “a swath of vacant land” into a “vibrant and growing oceanfront community,” with “affordable” homes starting at $559,000. (The land was vacant because a 1950 storm wiped it clean of structures.) The new homes were built on 167 acres of land raised five feet above the surrounding Far Rockaway area. Those Arverne homes mostly survived Sandy. But the high ground caused storm surges to rise higher and move faster elsewhere than they would have on Rockaway lowlands that are always hit head-on by northward moving storms.

If Sandy had been a category 3 hurricane like its 1938 ancestor, the devastation would have been of biblical proportions – as winds, waves and surges slammed into expensive homes, businesses and high-rises, and roared up waterways rendered progressively narrower by hundreds of construction projects.

Lower Manhattan has doubled in width over the centuries. World Trade Center construction alone contributed 1.2 million cubic yards to build Battery Park City, narrowing the Hudson River by another 700 feet. The East River has likewise been hemmed in, while other water channels have been completely filled. Buildings, malls and raised roadways constructed on former potato fields, forests, grasslands and marshlands have further constricted passageways for storm surges and runoff.

As a result, storms like Sandy or the Long Island Express send monstrous volumes of water up ever more confined corridors. With nowhere else to go, the surges rise higher, travel faster and pack more power. It’s elementary physics – which governors, mayors, planners and developers ignore at their peril.

No wonder, Mayor Bloomberg, Governor Cuomo and other politicos prefer to talk about global warming, rising seas and worsening weather – to deflect attention and blame from decisions that have put more people in the path of greater danger. Indeed, the very notion of packing more and more people into “sustainable, energy-efficient” coastal cities in the NY-NJ area is itself madness on steroids.

Worst of all, politicians are increasingly and intentionally obscuring and misrepresenting the nature, frequency and severity of storm, flood and surge risks, so that they can promote and permit more construction in high-risk areas, and secure more money and power. They insist that they can prevent or control climate change and sea level rise, by regulating CO2 emission – while they ignore real, known dangers that have arisen before and will arise again, exacerbated by their politicized decisions.

As a result, unsuspecting business and home owners continue to buy, build and rebuild in areas that are increasingly at risk from hurricanes, northeasters and “perfect storms” of natural and political events. And as the population density increases in this NY-NJ area, the ability to evacuate people plummets, especially when roadways, tunnels and other escape routes are submerged. Let the buyer beware.

Sandy may have been a rare (but hardly unprecedented) confluence of weather events. But the political decisions and blame avoidance are an all-too-common confluence of human tendencies – worsened by the dogged determination of our ruling classes to acquire greater power and control, coupled with steadily declining transparency, accountability and liability.

How nice it must be to have convenient scapegoats like “dangerous manmade global warming” and insurance companies – today’s equivalent of the witches whom our predecessors blamed for storms, droughts, crop failures, disease and destruction. It’s time to use the witches’ brooms to clean house.

Paul Driessen is senior policy advisor for the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow (www.CFACT.org) and author of Eco-Imperialism: Green power – Black death.

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Jimmy Haigh

Still… Mission accomplished. Obama won.

michel

Yes spot on. Not least because the US can do nothing whatever about global warming even if the IPCC is right. For a very simple reason, it is only about 15% of global emissions, and that percentage is falling as China and India ramp up. Whatever the politicians in the US do, it will have minimal effects even if the IPCC is right.
But spot on about blaming the effects of poor land use policies on AGW.

milodonharlani

Add to the list of culprits the self-styled environmentalists who blocked all efforts over the decades to build a storm surge barrier across the entrances to Upper or Lower NY Bay, such as those protecting Providence, R.I. & a number of European cities.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fox_Point_Hurricane_Barrier#Historical_background
The cost in treasure, let alone lives, just of Sandy greatly exceeds the construction expense of such a barrier. As if the development of NYC & environs since the 17th century hasn’t altered the environment of the region.

Tom in Texas

“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Friday approved a $60.4 billion aid package to pay for reconstruction costs from Superstorm Sandy, which ravaged mid-Atlantic and northeastern states, after defeating Republican efforts to trim the bill’s cost.

The bill also provides $17 billion in Community Development Block Grants to help rebuild homes, schools, hospitals and other buildings destroyed by the late October storm, help small businesses and improve the power infrastructure.”
Texas taxpayers are going to fund the rebuilding of uninsured schools and hospitals in NY & NJ?

Ed Reid

“Never let a crisis go to waste.”, Rahm Emanuel
Climate might not be cooperating with the alarmists, but weather still can.

Excellent article. Too bad the bought-and-paid-for corporate-owned media scribblers won’t pick it up. Which is no surprise: They have become glorified stenographers for entrenched politicians, greedy bankers and globalist power brokers.

Andrew

Good article, which all those of the Church of Warming will ignore. I think it could have benefited from stating that Sandy was barely and briefly a Category 1 hurricane at landfall in New Jersey (?). It should state what that means in wind speed, and that in New York/Manhattan Sandy was less than hurricane strength but it was geographically larger than usual because of the (already listed) contributory factors.

mike about town

great essay Paul!

Camburn

Mr. Paul Driessen:
It is obvious that you have not yet been infected with Skeptical Science Syndrome.
Please continue the inoculation process.

Very nice article well reasoned and referenced.
I have read tens of thousands of contemporary observations of the weather from 1000ad onwards. They are available in many places including those I do my research in such as the met office library and the Scott polar institute and great cathedrals whose records can be seen on animal hide.
There is no doubt at all that we currently live on benign times. The great storms of the past dwarf those of the present and seem to belong to eras of cooling not warming. Some day those great weather events will return and with our vastly greater population and much more vulnerable infrstructure the devastation will be truly immense.
We will of course blame it on agw instead of realising that our climate is hugly variable and that we have been very fortunate to live in the calm age we currently inhabit
Tonyb

martinbrumby

Just a query from a Civil Engineer in the UK.
How come no tidal barrier has been proposed?
And why, at least, aren’t critical subway / tunnel entrances provided with storm surge barriers?
Cost? Peanuts compared with the losses that Sandy caused. And obviously better value than pouring taxpayers’ money into Ruinable Energy projects (that don’t work).
Unbelievable. I can’t believe that Civil Engineers haven’t pointed this out years ago. No doubt the politicos didn’t see it as a vote winner?

Jack

Too true sadly.
Brisbane suffered a flood which exposed shonky planning. People were advised their houses were above flood level. The flood proved otherwise. Someone somewhere took money for shifting a line on a map. At least in Queensland the building code is to build for cyclone rating and it is enforced. Now having seen the error they are requiring new houses to be built 2 stories high with the floor being above flood level.
It was government greed, charging for water so they let the storage levels get too high and then were forced to release water in a huge surge because the wall was in danger of breaching.
The government accepted the green CAGW story fully. The Premier appointed her husband as the Department Head for Climate Change. So believing that permanent drought was the order of the day they refused to comply with the designed storage intent of flood mitigation. They increased the price of water, did not build further flood mitigation dams, foisted the cost of water infrastructure onto rate payers, built a desalination plant that has never been used.
As you can see in one example, Climate Change policies have cost Queensland especially the South East corner, billions of dollars for no reward, other than advancing green socialist expenses onto other people, while they are sucking on the taxpayers teat.
Apply that disaster world wide and the cost of warped green vision would be trillions, and never once out of a green pocket. Crocodile tears and saving the planet are a match.

All to true. Well said and sadly destined to be ignored by most if not all in any position of influence. These people are all True Believers and willfully ignore anything that does not fit the orthodoxy they have chosen to believe.

John West

Found this interesting, worth reading the article:
“The Seven Rules of Bureaucracy”
by Loyd S. Pettegrew and Carol A. Vance
http://mises.org/daily/5955/The-Seven-Rules-of-Bureaucracy
Rules of Bureaucracy
Rule #1: Maintain the problem at all costs! The problem is the basis of power, perks, privileges, and security.
Rule #2: Use crisis and perceived crisis to increase your power and control.
Rule 2a. Force 11th-hour decisions, threaten the loss of options and opportunities, and limit the opposition’s opportunity to review and critique.
Rule #3: If there are not enough crises, manufacture them, even from nature, where none exist.
Rule #4: Control the flow and release of information while feigning openness.
Rule 4a: Deny, delay, obfuscate, spin, and lie.
Rule #5: Maximize public-relations exposure by creating a cover story that appeals to the universal need to help people.
Rule #6: Create vested support groups by distributing concentrated benefits and/or entitlements to these special interests, while distributing the costs broadly to one’s political opponents.
Rule #7: Demonize the truth tellers who have the temerity to say, “The emperor has no clothes.”

James Ard

Excellent post, Mr. Driessen. So clearly stated that only a person with a self interest in the scam could disagree. Thanks, Anthony. It’s strong pieces like this that will turn the tables on them. Also, blaming politicians is a tact that might resonate with many Americans who may not be paying close attention to the issue.

Charles H

Most of the effects of this storm were eloquently predicted by weather organisations such as Weatherbell at least a week prior to the event. The fact that nobody heeds those who have superior knowledge is no surprise. What is a surprise is that the media seem to propagate the CAGW nonsense as a reason for these overdue natural events. Have the alarmists also full control of the media or is it just that the media want a good story? CO2 is a good cover story to force the public to pay additional taxation to fund the lifestyle of those that decide to live in prime locations. Unfortunately most people, educated or not, will continue to believe the alarmist hype until the propaganda machine is silenced.

MattN

“Manhattan got pounded in 1667 and by the Great Storm of 1693.”
Huh??

MrX

The most dangerous aspect of this CAGW propaganda is that the blame goes on unprecedented global warming which implies that the storm was too unpredictable to prepare against which is completely bogus. They knew weeks in advance that the storm was going to hit and they did nothing. That it was a tropical storm is another indication that things could have been much, much worse. But they avoid any and all responsibility. That is far too dangerous a position to take. The worst part is that this attitude of denying facts will continue to kill and harm people.

Doug M

As much as the Providence hurricane barrier protects the city of Providence, it puts the surrounding communities of East Providence, Cranston and Warwick at greater risk. Also, Providence is at the head of Narragansett Bay where the funneling storm surge would be blocked at a neck only few hundred feet wide. The landscape is just the opposite for Manhattan. Can’t imagine how such a barrier would be built there.

Gamecock

Tom in Texas says:
December 29, 2012 at 11:38 am
“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Friday approved a $60.4 billion aid package to pay for reconstruction costs from Superstorm Sandy, which ravaged mid-Atlantic and northeastern states, after defeating Republican efforts to trim the bill’s cost.
=================================================================
As Tom says, it is not the federal government’s job to pay for storm damage. Another slush fund for Obama to spend as he wishes.
BTW . . . This will completely eat the projected revenue from “raising taxes on the rich.”

John West

@ Paul Driessen
Great job, well done.
While I get your meaning with:
“It’s elementary physics – which governors, mayors, planners and developers ignore at their peril.”
It’s rarely themselves that are put in peril.

John West,
Thank you for the “Seven Rules.” They describe with precision the way any modern state operates.
I always wondered, why otherwise seemingly intelligent and educated people would continue to insist that “democracy” or “Republic” still exist.

eyesonu

Paul Driessen, thank you for the excellent post. In the following comments I expect to see many other related and contributing factors supporting you post.

AJ

Here is my attempt to put together a Power Dissipation Index for storms making landfall north of Chesapeake Bay (including Atlantic Canada) for the period 1851-2011. It’s a noisy signal, so unsurprisingly, I wasn’t able to find a significant trend:
https://sites.google.com/site/climateadj/home/noreast-pdi

Manfred

Things will only change if politicians will be held accountable with their own money.

DirkH

MattN says:
December 29, 2012 at 12:44 pm
““Manhattan got pounded in 1667 and by the Great Storm of 1693.”
Huh??”
What, “huh”? Read it before it’s edited away: (The wikipedia link is in the text above as well)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_New_York_hurricanes

Michael of Brisbane

I just posted this at Skeptical Science. Lets see if they leave it posted hey?
It’s under the Topic: Perspectives of 8 Scientists Attending AGU Fall Meeting.
“I think that what will “wake the sleeping masses” is for at least some of the predictions from modelling (and alarm) to actually happen, and for weather to actually become “extreme”.
Hurricane Sandy was not unusual in any way when compared historically, nor is any weather event that is blamed on AGW nowadays.
Thanks Boswarm, for the link to that article in The Age too.
(did you really use the word “allowing”??)
That article sums up my stance on AGW pretty well. (especially what it says about the use of the word “denier”.)
I am indeed one of the “sleeping masses” and I am very much awake already, thank you.”
Anthony, thank you so much for all your work!

Doug Huffman

The infrequent Black Swan event is less likely to be understood and/or forecast or its effects anticipated. Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Black Swan and Antifragile.

JimJ

Charles H says:December 29, 2012 at 12:39 pm
Have the alarmists also full control of the media or is it just that the media want a good story?
Yes, the vast majority of the media are true believers and relish reporting these events as proof of CAGW. The few that question the dogma won’t speak out for fear of getting their heads handed to them.
Jim

Patrick B

So they say with global warming these events will become more common? Then the only logical response is to not rebuild in these areas. I would like to see a Federal bill forbidding use of federal funds to rebuild in any areas that flooded.

Doug M, surge barriers would cost about $6B for the Verrazano Narrows and a billion or two for the other two ocean entrances. But your point is valid that a surge barrier around Manhattan would cause greater floods elsewhere. Specifically NJ would have to choose between ocean view and dike view along much of their coastline and other areas would not be savable.

brilliant.
we are not prepared for the storms of the past
much less the storms of the future
if agw is true then the next 30 years of extreme weather cannot be mitigated. adapting is necessary whether agw is true or not. if its

A. Scott

“WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Senate on Friday approved a $60.4 billion aid package to pay for reconstruction costs from Superstorm Sandy”
A supposed emergency aid package that is loaded with pork – spending either unrelated to Sandy, or not for immediate needs. Only between $9 and $12 billion will be spent in 2013 – the majority for spending that should go thru normal appropriations channels. It has been piled into this bill so they can bypass those basic controls.
Much of the spending is to rebuild in the same highly likely to be destroyed again areas.
And why are we making essentially grants – why are we providing handouts and not low interest loans for much of this work? Those people and communities have chosen to build in an area known to be disaster prone. They chose not to obtain adequate insurance. And now they want all Americans to pay.
I am all for as much emergency relief as is necessary to address emergency issues. Spending that won’t occur for a year or much more is not an “emergency.” All such non-emergency spending should be prohibited from being attached to any emergency relief bill.

james griffin

It is the duty of Governments and Local Authorities to prepare and deal with the climate hazard’s relating to the land areas under their jurisdiction. In California they have to prepare for earthquakes, in the mid-west it is Tornado’s. As a Brit looking from afar New Orleans city fathers had allowed the sea defences to fall into disrepair…something our Dutch neighbours accross the North Sea cannot afford to do. In New York the climate hazards appear to be bad storms, heavy snow falls and freezing temperatures most winters. It is therefore Mayor Bloomberg’s job to have plans in place…not blame it on fictional AGW.

Other_Andy

Powerful stuff Anthropogenic CO2.
Humans change 0.00004563% of the atmosphere, adding 0.117% to the total CO2 levels, resulting in hurricanes, disappearing polar ice, droughts, violent storms, floods, crumbling glaciers, rising seas and other unspeakable horrors.

Camburn

Michael of Brisbane says:
December 29, 2012 at 1:20 pm
Better be careful. With contrarian views, you won’t be able to post at SS very long. Even if you can back up your posts with published literature, it seems that the controllers at SS are not intersted in real science.

john robertson

So its time to relocate the centre of power to the ravaged beaches and institute a man your desk for the duration rule?
Or bury the guilty neck deep before the incoming tidal surge?
We are in this mess of lies, because we never found useful employment, beyond politics, for the witchdoctors. Rational thinking and reasoning our way through problems, what little we do of it, left the natural born shaman types without an outlet. Look what we made them do.
Now its,”If you don’t elect me a storm will strike”.
Other than that sarcasm, the convenience of blaming the weather on acts of other men, allows our politicos time to steal all they can and leave someone else to clean up the mess and or take the blame.
Of course once they get too evasive even the real dummies will wonder, what do we need you for?

polistra

It’s always about status. High-status people always get what they want, and low-status people always have to pay for it. Takers and makers, though not in the way the high-status people use those words.
High-status people enjoy living on beaches for some reason that I can’t begin to comprehend. What’s so special about sand? If you want sand in your yard, you can live on high ground and put sand in your yard.
But then I’m a low-status person and can’t hope to understand the superior ways of superior people. So I’m going to pay for the high-status people to rebuild their billion-dollar McMansions over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over and over. I’m not allowed to say that flood plains are places where floods happen.

Douglas C

Overhead power lines – for a developed country, it’s pathetic.

mpainter

martinbrumby says: December 29 2012 at 11:59 am
Just a query from a Civil Engineer in the UK.
How come no tidal barrier has been proposed?
And why, at least, aren’t critical subway / tunnel entrances provided with storm surge barriers?
Cost? Peanuts compared with the losses that Sandy caused. And obviously better value than pouring taxpayers’ money into Ruinable Energy projects (that don’t work).
Unbelievable. I can’t believe that Civil Engineers haven’t pointed this out years ago. No doubt the politicos didn’t see it as a vote winner?
===========================================
It has to do with the execrable quality of elected officials in this country, every one a sow’s ear. New Orleans was even worse- a ticking time-bomb waiting for a big storm to set it off. The levee could have been storm-proofed at modest expense. Now NYC. The political leaders will say AGW to deflect the blame, of course.
,

Goode 'nuff

Kirkmeyers said, ” They have become glorified stenographers for entrenched politicians, greedy bankers and globalist power brokers. ”
Those above are the ones who deserve their farce tax increases. Not the stressed out 200k+ people (many small business) who work 60-80 hours a week. Miss quality time with their spouses, kids and relatives. Use the least amount of public services. Face a high divorce rate and often stress related health problems.
It is UNFAIR for them to be tapped hard by this government that has become a wastefully spending hungry volcano demanding endless sacrifices.

Theodore White

A good piece by Paul Driessen, and good choice by Anthony Watts.
The thing about Superstorm Sandy is that it was forecasted. I did this in August and called it a full moon storm. Moreover, the astronomic signatures of this hybrid storm are those that we will see more often in a climate regime of global cooling.
And, as Charles H. says, “Most of the effects of this storm were eloquently predicted by weather organisations such as Weatherbell at least a week prior to the event. The fact that nobody heeds those who have superior knowledge is no surprise.”
This is the entire point. I gave three months warning of the storm and other organizations gave at least a week. The powers that be in New York & New Jersey did not listen to the long-range, nor the short-range warnings. They sat on their hands.
The mid-Atlantic and Northeast (again) are never prepared. The states and cities of New York and New Jersey are coastal so I agree with Driessen when he writes that, “Incompetence, stupidity, diversion, blame shifting, and false solutions to imaginary problems,” are responsible for the mess.
In fact, Drieesen is being too kind, “No wonder, Mayor Bloomberg, Governor Cuomo and other politicos prefer to talk about global warming, rising seas and worsening weather – to deflect attention and blame from decisions that have put more people in the path of greater danger. Indeed, the very notion of packing more and more people into “sustainable, energy-efficient” coastal cities in the NY-NJ area is itself madness on steroids.”
I say it is worse than that.
What happened, and the excuse of the lie of ‘man-made global warming’ is far worse than madness on steroids. What we have here are complete, full-blown idiots posing as leaders. It’s Gilligan serving as captain of the USS Enterprise and Gomer Pyle running Starfleet Command.
Meanwhile, it was reported that the U.S. Senate approved a $60.4 billion package to pay for reconstruction costs from Sandy with Republican efforts to trim the bill’s cost.
Now, on both the causes of climate change and Superstorm Sandy, the Republicans are right. And the aid package was amazingly hiked up beyond reality (most likely to use as graft for bogus claims and to grease friendly politico hands.)
This storm’s aid package should really be somewhere in the neighborhood of less than three billion dollars. The Jersey shore was hit hard, but it could have been much, much worse.
And Mayor Bloomberg should pay for the rest of the damage to New York himself since he and his staff ignored the long-range AND the short-range forecasts of the superstorm.
Superstorm Sandy was a warning of what’s to come from solar-forced climate change. This change is that of Global Cooling – far, far worse than global warming could ever be.
Global warming, I remind everyone, is GOOD for the world, but global cooling is NOT.
It has been my long-range climate forecast for all of us to expect increasing hybrid storms like Superstorm Sandy that pack enormous pressure, featuring heavy precipitation and blasting winds along with extremes of temperature (cold forced storms) to become more commonplace in the decades ahead – especially in the 2020s and 2030s.
The infrastructure, energy, power and supply needs to effectively handle and survive a climate regime of global cooling is what true leaders should have been working and preparing for.
But, that won’t happen until the generational establishment now in charge are removed from their positions along with the lie of ‘man-made global warming’ being finally flushed down the toilet never to resurface ever again.
Also, kudos to Drieesen for noting the piss-poor land-use planning of New York City:
“The East River has likewise been hemmed in, while other water channels have been completely filled. Buildings, malls and raised roadways constructed on former potato fields, forests, grasslands and marshlands have further constricted passageways for storm surges and runoff.”
This is spot on. What land use planners, especially in New York, always forget is the weather.
How that is so simply boggles the mind. Just how, in heaven’s name, can you plan without taking into account the most important factor of all?
Moreover, all that CONCRETE is NO GOOD when cities receive heavy precipitation from storm surges. It seems that the planners in New York forget that Manhattan is an island.
It is coastal. When there are storms like Sandy there is nowhere for fast surging water to go but into subway stations, into basements of homes and office buildings. These hybrid storms destroy rooftops, force buildings to fall apart and crumble. These storms saturate everything in its path with flood-ravaged tunnels, avenues, streets and roadways.
The years are coming when Mother Nature (that’s the law of physics that govern climate and weather) will speak with a more frequent voice in the name of Superstorm Sandy.
And, according to my long-range outlook, get used to hearing, seeing and experiencing these hybrid storms. These are very dangerous storms that signal what living under a global cooling climate regime will be like. It’s not a pretty picture.
The day is coming when those who put down global warming will pray for its return and all they will hear and feel are the blasting winds, the colder temperatures and heavy precipitation of global cooling and they will burn as many carbon sources as they possibly can to stay warm and survive.
Those who should pay the bills for all the damages are the same people who propagandized the outright lie of ‘man-made global warming’ and who haven’t learned the facts of life every Boy Scout is taught straight out of the gate:
“Be Prepared.”
– Theodore White, astrometeorologist. sci

D Böehm

mpainter says:
“It has to do with the execrable quality of elected officials in this country…”
True enough, most are not worth spit because they are beholden to special interests. The money that should have gone into storm mitigation was wasted instead on outrageous pay, pensions, and benefits for relatively unskilled workers like police and firefighters, who get most of their skills via on the job training. Any average person in reasonable health could do those jobs, and it requires even less skill, ability and health to be a paper pushing government bureaucrat. These people have become monkeys on the backs of hard-bitten taxpayers.
It is still going on. More than $60 billion is slated to be sent to the areas impacted by TS Sandy. But reading the bill’s language, a large part of that money will be payola for special interests, and will have nothing to do with storm damage. And as another commenter pointed out, that single expenditure will completely wipe out the expected revenue from Obama’s ‘tax the rich’ scheme. So the money isn’t even collected yet, and it’s already been spent. And it is certain that Obama’s people will have their hand out for more at every opportunity. They have learned to game the system. That means they have learned to steal from the productive workers.
Sooner or later there will be a financial storm that will make TS Sandy seem like a walk in the park.

Michael of Brisbane

I’ve caused a bit of a kerfuffle Camburn! Tom Curtis has replied with a long post.
Boy oh boy! Sensitive much?
(giggle)
I used to read SkS every day.
I don’t read it much any more though. In fact I’ve just posted again saying that I’ve lost confidence in them as being balanced and scientific, so I suppose they will ban me now.

Peter Miller

As we all know, ‘global warming’ can be blamed for almost anything bad which happens.
For incompetent politicians and bureaucrats. who failed to do what they should have done; and faced with the aftermath of a normal extreme weather event, global warming has been a godsend in providing fantasy excuses..

Goldie

I cannot believe how I’ll- prepared the developed world is for known natural phenomena. I completely agree with your comments, it’s a disgrace. Living in a country that has received it’s fair proportion of natural disasters in the last decade, it is obvious that our politicians have no clue as to proper risk management and mitigation, preferring the posturing of people who have no qualification in the areas that speak about.

Phil Ford

“…kirkmyers says: Excellent article. Too bad the bought-and-paid-for corporate-owned media scribblers won’t pick it up. Which is no surprise: They have become glorified stenographers for entrenched politicians, greedy bankers and globalist power brokers…”
Yes, this comment hits the nail on the head. CAGW zealots will look everywhere but right in front of them for anything to explain and justify their idiocy. It is a tragedy that articles such as Paul Driessen’s won’t find their way into mainstream broadcast/print. Such honest plain-speaking is not welcome aboard such a ship of fools; it goes against the manifesto, chafes the doctrine and frightens the horses.
Having experienced myself over the Christmas break just what it is like to be on the receiving end of the barely concealed hatred CAGW zealots deploy without hesitation against anyone (even family) who might publicly express severe doubts about the man-made global warming scare (in this case, my attacker was my own brother-in-law – a university professor, no less), I sometimes despair of common sense ever being regained in the face of such madness from climate alarmists.

Doug M says:
December 29, 2012 at 12:46 pm
As much as the Providence hurricane barrier protects the city of Providence, it puts the surrounding communities of East Providence, Cranston and Warwick at greater risk. Also, Providence is at the head of Narragansett Bay where the funneling storm surge would be blocked at a neck only few hundred feet wide. The landscape is just the opposite for Manhattan. Can’t imagine how such a barrier would be built there.

Here’s a recent WOWT comment that describes the practicalities of a barrier. (Too bad there’s no Robert Moses around to make this happen.)

Neil Jordan says:
November 5, 2012 at 2:39 pm
This morning’s American Society of Civil Engineers SmartBrief carried top story items:
ASCE warned years ago NYC faced huge storm-surge threat
ASCE warned of a major storm-surge threat to New York City during a 2009 seminar where it proposed measures designed to reduce risks. “Scientists and engineers were saying years before Katrina happened, ‘Hey, it’s going to happen, folks. Stop putting your head in the sand,’” said Malcolm Bowman of the State University of New York. The “most workable plan” would be the construction of a nearly five-mile barrier from Sandy Hook, N.J., to the Rockaway Peninsula, and another barrier across the East River, according to Bowman. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (11/4)
Link to full NY Times article is:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/05/nyregion/in-2009-engineers-detailed-storm-surge-threat-to-new-york-city.html?_r=0
The second article covers protecting the city before the next storm:
http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/nyregion/protecting-new-york-city-before-next-time.html
“While such a system is expensive to build — estimates range to $17 billion — Sandy’s damage and economic losses to the region may reach $50 billion, . . .
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
“The most intriguing option, according to Bowman who has looked at all of these plans, is a project called the New York- New Jersey Outer Harbor Gateway, a five-mile long system of causeways and gates extending from Sandy Hook in New Jersey to the Rockaways in Queens. While that system, conceptualized by the London-based engineering firm Halcrow Group, wouldn’t completely stop a surge, it would deflect the energy of the surge and diminish water to manageable levels, according to a Halcrow report.
““The thing about the Outer Crossing is that it could have a multipurpose function,” said Bowman. “It could act as a four-lane highway plus a rail connection between northern New Jersey and Long Island. It could be a very interesting New York City bypass as well as a rapid rail connection with Kennedy airport.”
““You could even make it toll road to pay for it,” he said.”

Reblogged this on pdx transport and commented:
Key quote: “placing generators in the basements of hospitals and skyscrapers built in areas that are barely above sea level”

Speed

While every Midwest mud puddle is declared a protected wetland, the New York Metroplex is asphalted, cemented, tiled, urbanized, industrialized and rendered unnatural and hazardous to humans and other living things.