Mapping the cold snap in South America

image

More from the “weather is not climate” department in the “hottest year so far ever”.

Our previous article on this here, illustrated the scope of the event in human terms, but we didn’t have a map to show extent of the cold air mass. One was needed given the revelation that the cold had crossed the equator from the South, a rather rare event.

Now we have a map that illustrates the magnitude, see below. Thanks to Joe D’Aleo of ICECAP.

Image of surface temperatures departure from normal for July 17, 2010 for South America, from NOAA NCEP:

http://icecap.us/images/uploads/JUL17SA.gif

NOAA being an American government operation, the scale is in °F

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74 thoughts on “Mapping the cold snap in South America

  1. This ICECAP thing confuses me. I see multiple articles by Anthony, but tho a lot of very interesting names are on the “About Us” page, none of them are Anthony’s. WUWT?

  2. Well, that’s a welcome missing piece to fill in.
    I don’t have time to look today – is there a synoptic map for that day somewhere? I’d like to see the weather systems at play (including those that brought warmer than average conditions to the southern end of the continent).

  3. Huge masses of air travelling N/S instead of E/W.
    Continental is Huge.
    This event should be front page news.
    My condolences, to all those who are suffering or have perished, even if the MSM is heartless.

  4. geo says:
    July 21, 2010 at 8:44 am

    This ICECAP thing confuses me. I see multiple articles by Anthony, but tho a lot of very interesting names are on the “About Us” page, none of them are Anthony’s. WUWT?

    ICECAP is based in New Hampshire and predates WUWT. I don’t understand where the legal structure ends and all the associations pick up, but my main contact is Joe D’Aleo and our paths cross fairly frequently at places like the Southern New England Weather Conference or at public testimony sessions around New Hampshire. In fact, it was Joe who made me realize when it was time to start getting involved in this field.
    Joe does the most work on icecap.us, and it’s basically links to lots of stuff. As WUWT has grown, very few things are escaping our notice, so it’s not at all surprising that each site has lots of links to the other.
    Joe’s original work centers around effects of PDO, AMO, and all the other oscillations.
    I sometimes point out things of interest in both directions, but I’m sure there are lots of people whose climate day centers around icecap.us and WUWT.
    The short answer – WUWT is not part of ICECAP, hence isn’t in the “about us”.
    Likewise, ICECAP isn’t listed in http://wattsupwiththat.com/about2/

  5. I ran across this research as I was attempting to understand the implications of the Bering Strait shutdown during the last glacial.
    The salinity of Bering Strait input also appears to have played a significant role in the 2007 Arctic melt – caused approximately 30-40% of the ice loss.
    Is the onset of the La Nina also changing the temperature and salinity of the Indian Ocean?
    Stability of the Atlantic Overturning Circulation: Competition between Bering Strait Freshwater Flux and Agulhas Heat and Salt Sources
    Wilbert Weijer, Wilhelmus P. M. De Ruijter, and Henk A. Dijkstra
    http://journals.ametsoc.org/doi/abs/10.1175/1520-0485%282001%29031%3C2385%3ASOTAOC%3E2.0.CO%3B2

  6. Weather events such as these certainly are paradoxical to the notion we are experiencing the hottest year ever.
    Out of curiosity, I looked up the historical extreme hot/cold weather records for my city and found that the hottest day still stands at 34.5 degrees C. This is a 30 year-old record, from 1981.

  7. Guys, keep in mind that that is an Anomaly map. The Synoptic map might help illustrate it better.

  8. How is that hot dried up amazon event coming? Ooops. Brazil will have to drink some of the alcohol to warm up instead of burning it in motor cars.

  9. I wonder how an agency backed by the American government could link an anomaly diagram with a scale expressing temperature differences in °F, when temperature differences are to be expressed in °K.

  10. b_nichol says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:05 am
    “Cold mid-winter day in parts of S. America.
    Got it.”
    Do you really? It’s the Antarctic cold air spreading north of the equator that is the unusual thing. I was in Jakarta the other day – it’s like Siberian air getting as far south as that. Maybe it will happen this northern hemisphere winter?
    These things never used to happen before we started killing the planet with our SUV’s…

  11. On the news last night here in Philly, where temperatures have been pushing the 90’s (F) lately, there was a big excited proclamation that scientists have shown this is the hottest global temperature on record. I think they quoted the average as 58F. I may be wrong about the exact numner, but hey, it’s not really exact anyhow. Luckily weather isn’t climate so I’m not too afraid they are going to link it to AGW (sarc). Interestingly, they never mention the cold anomolies in the southern hemisphere on the news. I only hear about that on WUWT.

  12. This map seems strange to me…..perhaps Ed Caryl is right and a synoptic map might help more. But even still……..it seems off.

  13. Very interesting on two parts.
    1 – On just a very quick search, I couldn’t find any references on the web of cold fronts crossing the equator. Please correct me if I am wrong but it doesn’t appear to happen on a regular basis.
    2 – I remember similar reports in 2009 of a severe cold weather in South America and Austrailia. The 2009 – 2010 was brutal by Floridian standards, and much colder than I have ever experienced while living in Florida, just south of Tampa for the past 30 years. Just curious if this is a precursor of things to come for the 2010 – 2011 winter in the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Jimmy Haigh says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:30 am
    It’s the Antarctic cold air spreading north of the equator that is the unusual thing. I was in Jakarta the other day – it’s like Siberian air getting as far south as that. Maybe it will happen this northern hemisphere winter?
    These things never used to happen before we started killing the planet with our SUV’s…

    Yes, it is unusual in the sense that it has not happened for a very long time. How long is the question.
    AGW/Climate Change would love for you to believe that the world began with the invention of the SUV.
    Ah, there it is. Right there in these heiroglyphics. See? They called it Atlantis. It sank due to global iron chariot thundering.

  15. Hugo M says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:28 am

    I wonder how an agency backed by the American government could link an anomaly diagram with a scale expressing temperature differences in °F, when temperature differences are to be expressed in °K.

    1) Pretty much the same way we lengthen runways by, say, 250 feet.
    2) Temperature differences in °F or °C are perfectly reasonable as long as they’re consistent.
    3) There’s no such thing as °K, only k for kelvin, just like there’s no such thing as degrees meter. “1 k” can represent something really cold or a small temperature change (at least if we’re talking about weather). Context remains important.
    As for “surface temperatures departure from normal,” you could argue it’s really a departure from average, and that we don’t have exact knowledge of normal. That likely came from NOAA, but what do they know?

  16. James Sexton says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:44 am
    That’s what happens when massaging breaks through the XXX barrier (you know, the kind of massages the Prophet likes) 🙂

  17. David L. says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:43 am
    Not only did this continental cold snap happen, it was predicted a week before it struck.
    MSM has ADD.

  18. Steveta_UK,
    The BBC and the met office use estimated max temperatures, it looks like the AGW believers at the met office pump up daily max estimates while ignoring lows.
    What the BBC shows is in fact near future estimates rather than actual raw temps which gives them the chance to overestimate as much as they dare and also the use only central metropolitan stations which will always give a higher max than the wider countryside.
    Its all about manipulating subtle surface perceptions with the BBC/met office now, you see most people look at the shiny maps and gizmos and look at the temperatures as though they are real when in fact the advertised temperature is a max estimate and it may only reach that for a few minutes if at all and the early morning and late night could be hugely lower but never ever mentioned or advertised.
    The BBC/met office rely on certain admen and magician tricks to create a superficial version of reality during the weather forecasts, no lows and no averages just max estimates while ignoring as much as they can cold areas and concentrating on warm areas. The phrase ‘much warmer than average for the time of year’ is used far more often than ‘much cooler than average for the time of year’.
    The BBC/met office used to advertise lows and daily averages untill the AGW fanatics found that childish tricks could alter the perceptions of their viewers and it has worked to a large extent and will untill the actual cooling becomes more severe than can be hidden in plain sight. From the average viewers perspective they will see what they expect to see and as any trickster/hustler will tell you, show the mark what they expect to see and there is no end to the things you can get away with unnoticed and unseen.

  19. PS to above post:
    The BBC may give the Sydney estimated MAX as 15C but it will never say that the previous days actual measured temps barely managed 12C and attained that for only a short time nor will they explain the average temps and minimums. Its like a pea and shell game really.

  20. Norseman says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:47 am
    It usually happens. Cold winds from the south pole are called the “pamperos” (wind of the plains) which blow from Antarctica northwards along the unobstructed by mountains plains of Argentina and the Amazon jungle; these winds can not usually cross over the high altitude andean mountains to the pacific coasts, which, btw, are much more tempered by the southern seas. These coasts are deserted because of the cold Humboldt’s current running from the south pole northwards, with the exception of those epochs when the El Nino counter current appears, and which runs north-south in the opposite direction, which is not the case right now.

  21. Cassandra King says:
    July 21, 2010 at 10:12 am
    Really. What it is happening now here in SA is that minimum temperatures and maximum temperatures are closer to each other, so the final effect is that heat loss is increased.

  22. Norseman writes:
    “The 2009 – 2010 was brutal by Floridian standards, and much colder than I have ever experienced while living in Florida, just south of Tampa for the past 30 years.”
    Right on the money, Norseman. If it is colder this winter, all the vegetation in my yard including the grass will be dead. In the last two winters, we lost all the ornamental bushes even though they were covered. We lost an ornamental tree that was about twelve feet tall. Coats were required from December through mid-April. The old timers say 1974 was the most recent year of similar temperatures. Heat in the house was also required. Usually, winter is perfect. What we had for the last two years is disgusting.

  23. Whatever are we to do with NOAA? Check out that temp scale for the map. Each mark should represent ±0.75. And, since only every other tick mark has been labeled, it should read:
    0.75
    2.25
    3.75
    5.25
    6.75
    8.25
    9.75
    11.25
    Notice that there are no extra ticks on the scale; it just jumps from 5.25 to 7.50 (instead of 6.75), an extra 0.75.
    Well — hell’s bells. No wonder there’s all this talk of global warming or climate change or whatever. The silly critters can’t even do the math. For the American audience who watches the show on Fox: nope, they ain’t smarter than a fifth grader.

  24. There was clearly a drop in the solar signal in the 2nd week of July. This resulted in a sharp drop in S.H. temp`s and a lower drop in the N.H. but enough to increase rainfall considerably, much like mid July 2009. The warmth has returned from around the 15th, which the N.H has responded to quickly being summer, and the S.H. is taking longer to recover due to it being winter, and having to make back up a bigger temp` difference; http://wxmaps.org/pix/temp8.html
    The mid month warm up provided the increase in S.H. precipitation that gave the heavy snow falls.
    Additional factors to the extent of S. America cold in particular recently, is incursions of polar air, and high levels of ozone over S. America.

  25. Cassandra King says:
    July 21, 2010 at 10:12 am
    Absolutely true. What is also interesting is that they stop using normal or average although these words have started to trickle back. In the old days they also used a descriptive range from very cold, cold, rather cold, average, warm, rather warm very warm. Now it’s just HOT even when the predicted/exagerated temp is only 2°C above norm and that in centrel London which is always 3°C above the surrounding countryside on average. Devious little devils.

  26. Cassandra King,
    notice – no picture on the BBC article on cold in Latin America – that would make it too memorable.

  27. Danish media are running a story about dead penguins washed ashore in Brazil because of cold water…..

  28. With such a large land mass multi-degrees below normal and half the US, Russia, China, Canada and Africa below normal, where is all the heat that is making for a record hot globe?

  29. Image of surface temperatures departure from normal for July 17, 2010 for South America, from NOAA NCEP:

    I’ve checked several weather stations in the region (Argentina, Chile, Paraquay, Uruguay), and all of them show average or only slightly below average temperatures for this July, so there have been just a couple of very cold days. However, in central and eastern Europe the average temperatures for this month so far are above or near record levels, and the heat is going to continue. Anybody see the difference?

  30. “Hundreds of dead penguins washed up in Brazil”
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-10707906
    “They say autopsies carried out on some of the carcasses suggest they could have starved to death, as their stomachs were completely empty.
    They are now trying to establish if strong currents and colder temperatures may be to blame.
    Thiago do Nascimento of the Peruibe Aquarium says the cooler than usual temperatures off the coast could have driven away the fish and squid the penguins feed on.
    But he did not rule out that overfishing could have decimated the penguins’ food sources.”

  31. Dear Peter Sorensen ,
    Have they ever been at the Brazilian coast ? It seems to me that all the garbage including the industrial one of Riodejaneiro and Saopaulo is dumped untreated in the Atlantic Ocean and oh my goodio the water is discolored and stinks over there .
    Compared to the atlantic ocean at Brasils shoreline the North Sea , previously a big industrial dump is like an excellent aquarium nowadays . The dead pinguins should be autopsied immediately for the cause of death , but that may be exactly the thing the brasilian government does not want . What is easier than to claim global warming being the cause and to find billions of believers distracting the audience from a probable very saddening reality ?

  32. It is called disinformation. Cold is hot, cooling is warming.
    Brazil is one of the larger dairy producers.
    I think one of those articles posted references 2 million dead bovines?
    Is there or does anyone have a link to data on if they are for meat or milk?
    What percentage of their farm animal population are affected?
    That could have significance on regional demand for food.
    TIA

  33. Tesla_x says:
    July 21, 2010 at 12:54 pm
    It is called disinformation. Cold is hot, cooling is warming.
    Brazil is one of the larger dairy producers.
    I think one of those articles posted references 2 million dead bovines?
    Is there or does anyone have a link to data on if they are for meat or milk?
    What percentage of their farm animal population are affected?
    That could have significance on regional demand for food.TIA

    The pictured animals are Brahman-cross meat animals. Bred to withstand the heat. Grown as crossbreds in the USA in the southern reaches, also for meat http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brahman_(cattle). Not an economical milk producing breed. Milking animals mostly have European ancestry, as in Holstein, Jersey, Guernsey http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dairy_cattle .

  34. Roald says:July 21, 2010 at 12:40 pm
    Image of surface temperatures departure from normal for July 17, 2010 for South America, from NOAA NCEP:
    I’ve checked several weather stations in the region (Argentina, Chile, Paraquay, Uruguay), and all of them show average or only slightly below average temperatures for this July, so there have been just a couple of very cold days. However, in central and eastern Europe the average temperatures for this month so far are above or near record levels, and the heat is going to continue. Anybody see the difference?

    Since the AGW debate concerns global averaged temperatures, the first difference I note is the difference in land mass between South America and central and eastern europe. Have you taken that into account?

  35. Norseman says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:47 am
    Reply; Meridional flows like that are a result of lunar declinational atmospheric tides, in this case the Moon crossed the equator on the 15th headed South, it pulled a large mass of cold air up the lee side of the Andes to form the total tidal bulge.
    When this happens in the USA in Texas they call them blue northers, weaker ones are called all sorts of names in the northern plains states. There are several papers on global circulation patterns crossing the equator .
    http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/72516565/abstract?CRETRY=1&SRETRY=0
    “”Meridional transport of air masses between the tropics and midlatitudes in South America are the most intense in the entire Southern Hemisphere, mainly due to the presence of the Andes. The incursions of tropical air into midlatitudes occur on the eastern side of the Andes in two preferred regions. The first is located in the tropical latitudes, close to the mountains between 20° and 30°S, and the second is a function of the position of the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ). All year long, the two preferred regions maintain their behaviour, with only small variations of their position or relative importance in different seasons of the year. The variability of the meridional transport is larger on the eastern side of the Andes, due to the presence of the mountain barrier, which favours baroclinic activity and allows an active exchange of air masses in both senses, especially during winter.””

  36. Tim Clark says:
    July 21, 2010 at 1:22 pm

    Since the AGW debate concerns global averaged temperatures, the first difference I note is the difference in land mass between South America and central and eastern europe. Have you taken that into account?

    ‘Course I have. This is why I suggested a couple of cold days in South America count for nothing in comparison to the extended heat wave in Eurasia (Yes, it’s also very hot in the Asian part of Russia).
    So let’s recapitulate. The warmest winter, spring, Jan-Jun period globally on record, heat waves from North America to Asia, etc (perhaps a short cold snap in América do Sul) despite the sun being in a minimum. Have the sceptics been lying to us?

  37. Although no mention is made of the lunar declinational atmospheric tides, (because they wanted to get funded) Rest of abstract;””The importance of the air mass transport is evident in the precipitation and surface temperature fields. During summertime, the Chaco Low (25°S and 65°W) intensifies due to the positive net radiation, favouring the transport of tropical air masses towards the south and the presence of strong convective activity, which is fed by moisture from tropical regions. During winter, the penetration of tropical air towards higher latitudes is more sporadic. The displacement of midlatitude air towards tropical latitudes occurs on both sides of the Andes. On the western side, the air associated with the subtropical Pacific anticyclone flows northward channelled by the Andes. On the eastern side, incursions of polar air towards lower latitudes are linked to cold fronts whose trajectory and movement is also favoured by the presence of the Andes. In particular, during wintertime the cold fronts are more intense and faster, and sometimes even reach tropical and equatorial latitudes which produces freezes in subtropical regions, such as the coffee growing areas in southeastern Brazil. In contrast, the incursions of cold air are notably weaker and less frequent in summer, and during these events the active cold fronts move northwards merging with the SACZ, which becomes more intense. Copyright © 2000 Royal Meteorological Society””

  38. Tesla_x says:
    July 21, 2010 at 12:54 pm
    It is called disinformation. Cold is hot, cooling is warming.
    Brazil is one of the larger dairy producers.
    I think one of those articles posted references 2 million dead bovines?
    Is there or does anyone have a link to data on if they are for meat or milk?
    What percentage of their farm animal population are affected?
    That could have significance on regional demand for food.
    TIA
    _____________________________________________________
    From a quick look at the picture I would say meat.
    Brazil is a huge exporter of beef. JBS- Swift, the biggest international meat packer in the world, is based in Brazil and owned by the Batista family. see: http://www.meattradenewsdaily.co.uk/news/230909/brazil___jbs__swift.aspx

  39. Cold in South America? What a pity you’ve never heard of southern Australia, where we are having unusual cold that’s lasted for weeks in July, when August is normally the coldest month.

  40. Roald says:
    July 21, 2010 at 1:37 pm
    So let’s recapitulate. The warmest winter, spring, Jan-Jun period globally on record, heat waves from North America to Asia, etc (perhaps a short cold snap in América do Sul) despite the sun being in a minimum. Have the sceptics been lying to us?
    _________________________________________________________
    Funny I am in North Carolina and I though winter would never end. It has been the coldest spring I can remember. Didn’t get hot till mid June and certainly has been much cooler than 2004 so far this year. I have also heard California and the west coast has been very cold, the guys in Florida just finished complaining about their plants freezing, Australia has had record lows and the Arctic temp map has been below normal all summer…
    Oh and do not forget all the livestock that froze in Mongolia in February this year or the penguins freezing to death in South Africa just recently or all the manatees that froze in Florida.
    By golly you are right it has been a record breaking WARM year this year, I sure hate to see it when it actually gets cold…

  41. Collecting actual regional variations is the essence of good data. Can I also suggest the compilation of a list of Growing degree Days sites. These are typically vineyards, vege growers, farmers and other commercial types, who need to explain to buyers how the variations in GDD have influenced their products. An example from SH – NZ : the Blenheim (in the north of the South Island) data series at http://www.wineresearch.org.nz/docs/BlenheimGDD.pdf

  42. b_nichol says:
    July 21, 2010 at 9:05 am
    Cold mid-winter day in parts of S. America.
    Got it.

    Transparent propaganda. Can’t even call it sophistry.
    The hot weather in the Northeast USA was normal summer weather.

  43. Peter Sørensen says:
    July 21, 2010 at 12:01 pm
    Danish media are running a story about dead penguins washed ashore in Brazil because of cold water…..
    Some people are making up convoluted reasoning to say global warming killed those penguins.What else could you expect though.

  44. Gail Combs says:
    July 21, 2010 at 3:16 pm
    Gee, that’s a surprise, Gail. I thought the warming was on the East Coast, as we here on the West Coast thought winter would never end. Ditto for Colorado.
    If that’s warming, I’d hate to see the cold stuff too.

  45. Gary Pearse says:
    July 21, 2010 at 12:18 pm
    With such a large land mass multi-degrees below normal and half the US, Russia, China, Canada and Africa below normal, where is all the heat that is making for a record hot globe?
    Wrong station sitting, temperature adjustments, and dropping of cold stations make warming:
    Joseph D’Aleo describes it in video:

  46. Presumably the cold reaching the equator now (rather than the NH winter) is a function of the earth’s maximum distance from the sun? When we are closer in NH winter, we have the sun at an angle, but stronger so it quickly tempers any cold air that gets close to the equator.

  47. “Cattle deaths exceed two thousand”.
    Thank goodness my Portuguese is bad.
    I was worried there for a minute that Brazilian Steakhouses were the next thing on the endangered species list.
    That would be bad.

  48. rbateman says:
    July 21, 2010 at 5:19 pm
    Gail Combs says:
    July 21, 2010 at 3:16 pm
    Gee, that’s a surprise, Gail. I thought the warming was on the East Coast, as we here on the West Coast thought winter would never end. Ditto for Colorado.
    If that’s warming, I’d hate to see the cold stuff too.
    ==============================================
    Gail I take it you are in the western NC, up in the highlands?
    Because points east and northeast have been firecracker hot (and good ole’ summertime drought dry).
    Also, I know its all relative to where you live, but this past winter, temperature-wise, was not harsh, the farther north and east you go [remember the stubborn, towering height anomaly over the NE US and NE Canada].
    The mature stage of the warm AMO has seen to that.
    That ain’t to say the world ain’t cooling as a whole…
    But we don’t feel it so far in the heavily populated Mid-Atlantic and NorthEast.
    10 PM and dry, hard ground yielding no cooling outside with a temperature of 86 degrees with 71% humidity.
    The robins only feed right now in the yards of those who water to keep it green.
    There were oppressive dewpoints, precipitable waters of over 2 inches, steep lapse rates and high CAPE values today [you could see the milky moisture in the air] but, once again, no disturbance to trigger that instability so no thunderstorms.
    Argggghhhh.
    Summertime….and the livin’ is mopey….lol
    Chris
    Norfolk, VA, USA

  49. Checking Phoenix Sky Harbor unadjusted temps at GISS, this years rank (1 is coldest) by quarter (starts in Dec) for the past 31 years (1980)
    DJF = 13th out of 31
    MAM = 7th out of 31
    Thought i started tanning a little later than usual this year.

  50. Checking Phoenix Sky Harbor *ADJUSTED* temps at GISS, this years rank (1 is coldest) by quarter (starts in Dec) for the past 31 years (1980)
    DJF = 5th out of 31
    MAM = 2nd out of 31
    June =12 out of 31
    Sorry for the multiple posts, should have combined.

  51. Wouldn’t it be grand if all we had to do was take this image of surface temperature departure from normal for July 17, 2010 for South America, and overlay it onto North America and change the date to January 17, 2011? I’ll bet someone at NOAA has already tried. Schucks! Double Schucks! Ya jus’ can’t win!

  52. This evening (July 22) the Belgian/Flemish television mentioned the heat wave in the region of Yakutsk, Siberia. But not a single word about the intense COLD wave in South America. Always that biased information!

  53. Since Eastern Europe/Russia were mentioned in this and the previous piece on Aysen and the blizzard, northeastern Poland has had several hot days (nothing too extreme except when it’s muggy), there have also been record deluges of rain, near-tornado-type phenomena and you could see your breath during the midday in June. In other words, the weather has been extremely unsettled, oscillating between extremes of cold and fairly hot, on a daily basis. Probably something like the deserts of Peru or the no-man’s-land claimed by both China and India, except with heavy precipitation but only in flood-like bursts. In all likelihood there will be more flooding and more cold snaps before “summer” ends. inb4 anecdotal etc.
    (I saw the NOAA map earlier at another site when looking into the Aysen story, but I am not giving it much credence because of the contours of the cold air mass and the reports of record cold from Australia, New Zealand and South Africa as well as Antarctica. This seems hemispheric to me.)

  54. From the weather is not climate bureau.
    Engelberg Switzerland, Today 23 July 2010
    Temp 5°C
    Weather Heavy snow
    Skiers out in force

  55. and MOST of Northern Hemisphere is having extremely hot summer. Russia hit a record on the 22th. Heat waves where I am in Bulgaria too. Why are you so obsessed with South America?

  56. The heat waves in the temperate zones of the northern hemisphere are not all that unusual. I can remember a few very nasty ones in the northern plains states where I lived as a child/young adult where it was well over 100f daily for weeks. I can also remember winters where it did not get above 0f for three months and where it snowed so much that we literally had to tunnel out of the house. Big deal-stuff like that occurs with enough regularity as to not be totally unexpected or deemed unique.
    It also seems that most of the posters screeching about this heat wave have forgotten that last winter was extremely snowy and cold for many of the same places now affected by the heat wave.
    What is unusual for this situation is to have such cold temperatures at the equator, as someone pointed out it would be like having Jakarta or Singapore having freezing temperatures.. This is what the original post was about and it is a rather unique event.

  57. “and MOST of Northern Hemisphere is having extremely hot summer. Russia hit a record on the 22th. Heat waves where I am in Bulgaria too. Why are you so obsessed with South America?”
    Perhaps because heat waves in Russia/Siberia are not that rare, while the great cold wave in South America is really exceptional.
    Moreover, if you only mention heat waves and say nothing about cold waves, you give a biased picture of the situation.

  58. Well posted ‘Truthlover’
    It stands to reason that if you get a mass of cold air move northwards from the antartic, that cold air has to be replaced by an air mass from elsewhere.
    Just like in the northern hemishere last December – when Europe got the cold air, Canada and Alaska was basking in 10C above the seasonal average. Overall there is a net warming but let’s keep pretending its not true.
    I laugh at half the posting here. The material here makes an excellent basis for Anthropoligy in the future.
    Most of us are still at stage 1
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K%C3%BCbler-Ross_model

  59. Paul Millsom says:
    “I laugh at half the posting [sic] here. The material here makes an excellent basis for Anthropoligy [sic] in the future. Most of us are still at stage 1”
    By “us” you mean the clique of corrupt scientists and their sycophants who can not believe that people are actually starting to question them now. No doubt you can’t believe it’s really happening after all the years when “trust us” was enough.
    I’m already on my second bowl of popcorn. ☺

  60. What we have been witnessing across South America in the Southern Hemisphere this winter is a period of phenomenally cold weather no doubt due to the unusual movement of air masses such as we had last winter in parts of the Northern Hemisphere.
    This is not attributable to anthropogenic global warming [AGW] or CO2 levels. Carbon Dioxide remains a trace gas in the atmosphere, present in very low quantities.
    The panic and alarm created by certain elements of the scientific community and quite a few politicians around the globe is not in any way justified or useful. These type of weather phenomena are worthy of close study and analysis, no reputable scientist would jump to a sudden conclusion without proven facts and comparisons being made.
    I regret to say that I have little faith in most of the present claims being made about climate change and global warming. Since the end of the last ice age 10,000 years ago and the arrival of the big thaw, Earth’s climate has been changing in regular cycles.
    What we should be doing is researching these cycles and identifying the nature of the cause. Man’s presence and the CO2 emission levels since the Industrial Revolution cannot be used to justify climate change since these cycles have been happening for a far longer period of time.
    The scientific study must continue and a lid kept on false claims for political purposes.

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