Get your ice here! New WUWT Sea Ice Machine

http://www.kirbysupply.com/Equipment/Ice_Machines/Ice-Machines-Banner.jpg
Courtesy of Kirby Supply - click for a physical ice machine

Tired of surfing the net to get all the widely spread sea ice graphs and images? I got your back.

Introducing the WUWT Sea Ice Machine.

Given the intense interest in Arctic Sea Ice this year, since it appears we have a potential for recovery again, I’ve decided to put all the sea ice graphs and imagery in one handy place for easy nail biting reference.

The familar JAXA thumbnail in the right sidebar now links to this page. Please let me know if there are additional graphs or images that are worthwhile for inclusion.

The page is available on the menu at the top under the header. I don’t know why I didn’t do this sooner.

Direct link (suitable for bookmarking or linking to from your website) is here:

http://wattsupwiththat.com/sea-ice-page/

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Robert Morris
July 17, 2010 12:41 pm

Oh man, Anthony is backed by Big Ice! 🙂

Amino Acids in Meteorites
July 17, 2010 12:43 pm

one handy place for easy nail biting reference
Sit back and have some popcorn! 😉

a jones
July 17, 2010 12:46 pm

Neat idea. Very convenient and more informative than trawling separate sites. It’s all to hand as it were.
Congratulations on yet another useful improvement.
Kindest Regards

July 17, 2010 12:49 pm

Will multi-year ice be available?
REPLY: Sure, suggestions as to source? – Anthony

Stephan
July 17, 2010 12:54 pm

Will these be “live” or do we have to go to the actual sites?
REPLY: These are all updated live. When those websites update, so does WUWT’s Sea Ice Page – Anthony

July 17, 2010 12:55 pm

Great idea.
No more nail biting.
At some point it would be good to put up a simple chart showing the estimated
volume of ice and snow on 1. Greenland, 2. The Arctic Ocean, and 3. Antarctica
with the rate at which credible scientists think there is melting and then depicting
how many years it would take for these to melt.

DirkH
July 17, 2010 12:57 pm

Great resource! Thanks!

Martin C
July 17, 2010 1:00 pm

This is great. I had bookmarked a number of these sites just to try to stay informed as I read/hear about arctic ice changes, etc. Now I can replace them all with this.
I do have question about concentration of ice in the color plot and sea ice area: how do melt ponds on the ice affect the values? Can the melt ponds vs. open water be differentiated? Or do melt ponds, because it is ‘water on the surface’ count against the concentration?

stephan
July 17, 2010 1:03 pm

OT but this has got to be one of the largest systems I’ve ever seen and its 8C daytime which is about 15C below average for this time of year. maybe the extra large Antarctica is promoting more extended cold clockwise whirpools pools deep into the SA tropics…..
http://www.wunderground.com/wundermap/?lat=-25.23999977&lon=-57.52000046&zoom=8&pin=Asuncion%2c%20Paraguay&type=hyb&rad=0&wxsn=0&svr=0&cams=0&sat=1&sat.num=1&sat.spd=25&sat.opa=85&sat.gtt1=109&sat.gtt2=108&sat.type=VIS&riv=0&mm=0&hur=0
REPLY: Broken link

geo
July 17, 2010 1:05 pm

Anthony–
I love you, man. <>
Don’t know if it is at all a reasonable request, but some way to show the most recent Cryosphere comparo images for current year vs an interesting baseline year (2007? 2008? Alas, 2009 is not available) would be greatly appreciated.
That might be a technical bridge too far, and I understand that. But maybe not, as they seem to be sticking them in an archive with a constant naming scheme. . .
REPLY: that requires some custom code, like Javascript, and wp.com hosting doesn’t allow that unfortunately. – Anthony

geo
July 17, 2010 1:14 pm

Well, I could see popping their tool would, but would calculating a date to use as a substition string?
The format for all their images is this: http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/ARCHIVE/20100715.jpg But of course they are always at least a day-behind on the current year, and lately for some reason two days behind, so you’d need to be able to subtract two.
Anyway, just a suggestion.
REPLY: maybe somebody could host some code on an external server that could generate a live image URL for WUWT? WP.com limits even basic coding in pages. -Anthony

Editor
July 17, 2010 1:15 pm

These might be helpful to add for the Antarctic;
http://www.iup.uni-bremen.de:8084/amsr/ice_ext_s.png
http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/S_bm_extent_hires.png
and here are the Arctic versions as well:
http://www.iup.uni-bremen.de:8084/amsr/ice_ext_n.png
http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/N_bm_extent_hires.png
Also, a source guide at the bottom might be valuable, e.g.:
The Cryosphere Today – Arctic Climate Research at the University of Illinois:
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/
http://arctic.atmos.uiuc.edu/cryosphere/IMAGES/
National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC):
http://nsidc.org/
http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/
http://nsidc.org/searchlight/
University of Bremenpart
http://www.iup.uni-bremen.de/eng/
http://www.iup.uni-bremen.de/iuppage/psa/2001/amsrop.html
http://www.iup.uni-bremen.de:8084/
International Arctic Research Center/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (IARC-JAXA)
http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/en/
http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/en/home/
Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI)
http://ocean.dmi.dk/english/index.php
http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/index.uk.php
REPLY: And I’m reminded by this that I forgot NANSEN too. Thanks -Anthony

Ivor
July 17, 2010 1:23 pm

Thank you so very much sir.

Ibrahim
July 17, 2010 1:23 pm
rbateman
July 17, 2010 1:28 pm

I like it. One stop shopping.

David Hoyle
July 17, 2010 1:29 pm

Wheres the polar bears???WHERES THE POLAR BEARS???

GregO
July 17, 2010 1:33 pm

There’s only one word for this…Cool!
Thanks Anthony

Jimbo
July 17, 2010 1:35 pm

Exellent stuff! Just what the doctor ordered. When battling with warmists I can simply ask them to look at 1 link with their own lying eyes (I hope while biting nails).
REPLY: Use the shortlink URL for this page: http://wp.me/P7y4l-5Kc

Ed Caryl
July 17, 2010 1:41 pm

Thank you very much! Bookmarked

kagiso
July 17, 2010 1:45 pm

cryosphere arctic regions down the bottom for us with a very serious habit?
REPLY: Not interested in arguments over placement, take it or leave it. Beggars can’t be choosy, especially when I dedicate my Saturday to providing a public service – Anthony

Dave Springer
July 17, 2010 1:58 pm

The two graphs I like are the arctic and antarctic anomalies in million square kilometers with the zero line being the 1978-2000 average.
If those two were sequential it would be real easy to see the that negative anomaly at the north pole is matched by an equal and opposite positive anomaly at the south pole.
Kind of puts things in perspective and makes me think of Newton’s third law of motion: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

GaryB
July 17, 2010 2:06 pm

Sweet! Excellent work as always! If only everyone interested in global warming and AGW would look at ALL of the data (as is presented here) rather than just the select data that fits preconceived notions.

Scott Covert
July 17, 2010 2:15 pm

Thanks Anthony!
Very nice.
How about a solar page?
Not to sound ungrateful.
You do so much already, I really appreciate your work. Thanks for all you do.
REPLY: Why you ungrateful little #@^&(#4! …uh OK – Anthony

Editor
July 17, 2010 2:23 pm

Dave Springer says:
July 17, 2010 at 1:58 pm
“The two graphs I like are the arctic and antarctic anomalies in million square kilometers with the zero line being the 1978-2000 average.
If those two were sequential it would be real easy to see the that negative anomaly at the north pole is matched by an equal and opposite positive anomaly at the south pole.
Kind of puts things in perspective and makes me think of Newton’s third law of motion: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.”
Ideally Cryosphere Today and NSIDC would offer merged Arctic and Antarctic charts like rbateman developed:
http://www.robertb.darkhorizons.org/seaice.anomaly.Ant_arctic.jpg
Perhaps if we ask Cryoshoere Today:
cryosphere-data@atmos.uiuc.edu
and NSIDC;
http://nsidc.org/forms/asna.html
nicely, they might be inclined to begin offering this information on their websites.

wayne
July 17, 2010 2:23 pm

Love the cam at the north pole showing the poly bears basking in the hot summer sun with their sun umbrellas and all! But, any way to get the ice and snow off of the lense? /sarc
Thank you, thank you, thank you, Anthony!

Editor
July 17, 2010 2:27 pm

Great Page, Anthony… I check in on DMI, JAXA and Arctic ROOS almost everyday and that’s a lot of clicking and pointing. It’s nice to have all those charts and links in one place. It’s still a long way until the melt season bottoms out… or is supposed to, but those graphs are starting to look scary, in a cold sort of way.

latitude
July 17, 2010 2:35 pm

Thank You
Thank You
Thank You

dh7fb
July 17, 2010 2:38 pm

Hi all, I made two new kinds of charts based on the daily JAXA-Dates. In the first you can see the daily development of the anomaly in extent without “eye cancer” 🙂 in relation to the years 2006-2009 and the median of the years 2003-2009 and also in relation to the max and min dates: http://www.dh7fb.de/noaice/image010.gif.
In the second one you can see the development of the daily ice-loss: http://www.dh7fb.de/noaice/image021.gif also in relation to the years b4. Both charts are updated daily at about 04:00 UT.
Enjoy! DH7FB with best greetings!

July 17, 2010 2:40 pm

I’d strongly suggest adding the pole centered 30 day animation from Cryosphere Today. It really gives a far better perspective on what is going on than any of the one dimensional graphs of extent or thickness (which are very misleading, especially now while winds and currents have the melting and thinning ice pretty much stalled in place, so that nothing seems to change, when in fact the rate of melt is progressing normally, if not faster than normal), or single day snapshots which give no sense of the rate of change.
30 Day Arctic Ice Animation

Manfred
July 17, 2010 2:44 pm

Don’t use the “r”-word !
In climate science, arctic sea-ice going up is never a “recovery”, at best it may be called a “travesty”.

July 17, 2010 2:52 pm

Thank you!

DirkH
July 17, 2010 2:59 pm

sphaerica says:
July 17, 2010 at 2:40 pm
“[…]Today. It really gives a far better perspective on what is going on than any of the one dimensional graphs of extent or thickness (which are very misleading, […]”
It was good enough in Summer 2007, wasn’t it?

paul revere
July 17, 2010 3:14 pm

Fantastic!!

Sean2829
July 17, 2010 3:26 pm

How about a graph of the total ocean heat content, particularly that derived from the Argo Bouy data. I bet you could find a nice picture of a calorimeter to show it off.

Editor
July 17, 2010 3:29 pm

The way AMSRE sea ice extents is trending, 2010 is exceeding not only 2007 minimum extents, but also 2008, and 2009 by wide margins.
Extending the ever-decreasing slope portends greater than 7 million km^2 at minimum. Will it reach that point? As the IPCC says in its numerous Summaries for Policymakers, that possibility cannot be excluded and is within a scientific certainly of 5% – and so we must spend 1.3 trillion dollars preventing it.
More likely, say at 25% + possibility, is Arctic sea ice extents exceeding 6 million km^2. At 45%+ possibility is it being right near recent normals and exceeding 5.75 million km^2.

Ale Gorney
July 17, 2010 3:32 pm

no ide a what his piece of shit articlfe is about. wow, i just drajkmk drank two bottles o f scottch.. at least i think so. or whaterver
REPLY: You must be TCO under a new handle

John Hounslow
July 17, 2010 3:32 pm

What’s a JAXA thumbnail?

adrian smits
July 17, 2010 3:35 pm

we seem to have lost our dmi polar ice temperature comparison to previous years. Whats up with that?
REPLY: try this new browser feature, called a scroll bar (or scroll wheel on mouse). 4th graph down on the new sea ice page – Anthony

Michael
July 17, 2010 3:50 pm

OT
A Puzzling Collapse of Earth’s Upper Atmosphere
“NASA-funded researchers are monitoring a big event in our planet’s atmosphere. High above Earth’s surface where the atmosphere meets space, a rarefied layer of gas called “the thermosphere” recently collapsed and now is rebounding again.
“This is the biggest contraction of the thermosphere in at least 43 years,” says John Emmert of the Naval Research Lab, lead author of a paper announcing the finding in the June 19th issue of the Geophysical Research Letters (GRL). “It’s a Space Age record.”
The collapse happened during the deep solar minimum of 2008-2009—a fact which comes as little surprise to researchers. The thermosphere always cools and contracts when solar activity is low. In this case, however, the magnitude of the collapse was two to three times greater than low solar activity could explain.”
http://www.infowars.com/a-puzzling-collapse-of-earths-upper-atmosphere/

TLou
July 17, 2010 3:51 pm

Anthony,
Good to see you at the Perk the other day. Working on a Saturday to make something we can all use is appreciated. This is worth a hit to the tip jar. Enjoy your next coffee on me!

Editor
July 17, 2010 4:23 pm

Thanks Anthony. The page makes it a lot easier to see and compare without having to run multiple screens.
I will be adding a special link to the page in the sidebar on my blog. Unless you object I will use this image for that purpose.
http://www.leekington.com/images/WattsIce.jpg

David Y
July 17, 2010 4:25 pm

I’ve gotten very little sleep lately, so pardon me if this question is idiotic…but what’s that blob (looks like a big floaty arrow-shaped buoy) on NOAA’s Drifting “North Pole” camera? Is it a buoy attached to the camera? Or where my cursor lands on the ice when I move it there 😉 ??

u.k.(us)
July 17, 2010 4:27 pm

At risk of adding to your considerable burden, how about a SST page?
Just a thought.
Thanks for your oasis of sanity.
REPLY: sure why not, and maybe a Gore tracker page too 😉 – Anthony

intrepid_wanders
July 17, 2010 4:35 pm

Awesome Anthony! Cryosphere at my fingertips.
I did find one bad link. On the “Antarctic Sea Ice Extent” graphs, it links to http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/S_bm_extent_hires.png .
REPLY: Fixed thanks

INGSOC
July 17, 2010 4:42 pm

Hey! How about offering a cruise to the North Pole? I have some experience with those things that float. What are they called again? Goats! Na, that don’t sound right… Never mind! I can swim real good, and if you hang on to my shorts we’ll do just fine! We’ll take some beach umbrellas and some brewskis. Someone should bring a gun though. I’m Canadian, so they won’t let me have one. We can portage to the McKenzie river delta, then start swimming from there. Bring some Off.

Dave Wendt
July 17, 2010 4:54 pm

Anthony; thanks again for another very helpful addition. The only one missing from my check daily, well almost, list is CT’s 2 yr. Recent Arctic Ice Area graph. On a related note, I have been operating under the impression that CT and NANSEN used very similar data for their Arctic Ice Area graphs, though I can’t remember where I absorbed that notion. Have I been mistaken in this? If not, why is there such a large discrepancy between the two, a half million km2 or more, over recent weeks?

Paul McCauley
July 17, 2010 4:59 pm

Great improvement! Hmmm….polar wind graphs?

Roger Knights
July 17, 2010 5:00 pm

John Hounslow says:
July 17, 2010 at 3:32 pm
What’s a JAXA thumbnail?

It’s the 7th thumbnail under the heading “Live Weather Roll” in the sidebar. It looks like a multi-colored roller coaster.

1DandyTroll
July 17, 2010 5:13 pm

Well concerning ice, I really liked this newer image that is used in Collapse of (Climate) Physics” from July 13, http://claesjohnson.blogspot.com/2010/07/collapse-of-climate-physics.html
That’s a lot of thick ice, with a lot of algae, I somehow believe, growing on the ice all the way to the top. Heh either the algae grows really fast in sub zero degrees or that ice has been around for a time.

latitude
July 17, 2010 5:27 pm

TLou says:
July 17, 2010 at 3:51 pm
Anthony,
Good to see you at the Perk the other day. Working on a Saturday to make something we can all use is appreciated. This is worth a hit to the tip jar. Enjoy your next coffee on me!
—————————————————————————————————–
and another hit
Thank you again Anthony

Frederick Michael
July 17, 2010 5:34 pm

I really like the animations here:
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/gallery_np.html
You can compare how this year looks at the pole to some previous. The end of 2007 is awesome.
By the way, if you ever really want to get an ice machine, check out the Kitchen Aid ones. They freeze a slab of ice and the slide it on to hot wires to cut it into cubes. Really. With reverse-osmosis filtered water it makes perfectly clear cubes the size of dice. Best ice on earth. Why pour expensive drinks over lousy ice? The cost of the ice is insignificant, even which this fancy set-up.

July 17, 2010 5:41 pm

geo says:
July 17, 2010 at 1:05 pm

Don’t know if it is at all a reasonable request, but some way to show the most recent Cryosphere comparo images for current year vs an interesting baseline year (2007? 2008? Alas, 2009 is not available) would be greatly appreciated.
That might be a technical bridge too far, and I understand that. But maybe not, as they seem to be sticking them in an archive with a constant naming scheme. . .

REPLY: maybe somebody could host some code on an external server that could generate a live image URL for WUWT? WP.com limits even basic coding in pages. -Anthony

I’m note entirely sure what geo is looking for, but it seems to me I could write something to update a .png file with with a comparison image comparing the latest Cryosphere image with one from the same date on 2007. (Or 2008, which has an archive image for Feb 29.)
I could put the image in a fixed place in my Comcast area (currently I don’t think they’re checking bandwidth), at wermenh.com (which has an atrociously low limit, I almost moved to bizland.com in May), or at wattsupwiththat.com if I can get to it via FTP (ideal from my point of view).
It means playing a bit with Cryosphere’s form processor, but should be doable and not annoy them.
I already do something like that to get the data behind http://wermenh.com/runnings_2010.html
It’s about time we talk about getting my Tables of Content stuff up to wattsupwiththat.com anyway….
-Ric

OldUnixHead
July 17, 2010 5:48 pm

Thanks for the consolidated sea ice info. Would it be too much to ask that the NPEO Pole-webcam images be shown adjacent to NPEO’s installation drift maps, too?
(Drift map)
.
The map has a lot of extraneous info with respect to just the webcam installation(s), but it might be useful for showing how off-Pole those cams can be.

July 17, 2010 6:00 pm

Anthony
Some more links for your Sea Ice Machine
CCIN Canadian Cryospheric Information Network: Current Arctic Sea Ice Extent
http://www.socc.ca/cms/en/socc/seaIce/currentSeaIce.aspx
NSIDC National Snow and Ice Data Center: Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis
http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/
Environment Canada: Canadian Ice Service
http://www.ec.gc.ca/glaces-ice/default.asp?lang=En&n=D32C361E-1
NOAA Arctic Report Card: Update for 2009
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/reportcard/
FMI Finnish Meteorological Institute: Ice Conditions
http://www.fmi.fi/weather/index_9.html?mode=1
SMHI Swedish Meteorological & Hydrological Institute: Sea Ice
http://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=sv&tl=en&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.smhi.se%2Fklimatdata%2Foceanografi%2Fhavsis

morgo
July 17, 2010 6:14 pm

all we need is the number of polar bears at any given time standing on the ice or having to swim to keep alive Im am sure this information will help the bears stressfull life

Mike McMillan
July 17, 2010 6:22 pm

Manitowoc Scotsman ice machines.
As much time as I’ve spent in hotels, I really don’t miss those suckers down the hall humming away all night inbetween bouts of dispensing buckets of ice one clunking cube at a time.

Gail Combs
July 17, 2010 7:13 pm

Thank you, your hard work is much appreciated. Other sites just do not compare to this one.

savethesharks
July 17, 2010 8:28 pm

This is a “critical mass” of sorts….of the truth. Everything assembled in once place.
Bravo.
Chris
Norfolk, VA, USA

Jack Simmons
July 17, 2010 8:29 pm

Nice. Thanks.

Baa Humbug
July 17, 2010 8:35 pm

I grew tired of watching grass grow,
and am no longer too excited by watching paint dry,
but watching sea ice grow should be exciting.
“Baaabe, get me a beer”.

CRS, Dr.P.H.
July 17, 2010 8:45 pm

Thanks, Anthony! However, you forgot the always-popular Barrow Sea webcam!
http://seaice.alaska.edu/gi/observatories/barrow_webcam

Amino Acids in Meteorites
July 17, 2010 9:02 pm

REPLY: sure why not, and maybe a Gore tracker page too 😉 – Anthony
No need for a special page for that. Just look for areas of sudden cold and snow.

anna v
July 17, 2010 9:12 pm
Policyguy
July 17, 2010 9:17 pm

Great idea. It’s bookmarked.
Thank you

kadaka (KD Knoebel)
July 17, 2010 10:18 pm

Found in: u.k.(us) on July 17, 2010 at 4:27 pm

REPLY: sure why not, and maybe a Gore tracker page too 😉 – Anthony

Too late for that. Once Al and Tipper really broke up he took off the GPS tracking collar she had him wear. Shame really, I heard it was a Valentine’s Day gift.
————————
From: sphaerica on July 17, 2010 at 2:40 pm

I’d strongly suggest adding the pole centered 30 day animation from Cryosphere Today.

On behalf of those of us on dial-up, I respectfully ask:
Are you freaking nuts?

July 17, 2010 10:28 pm

Anthony you realize the stir amongst the ACGW crowd this article is going to incite don’t you?
They accuse us of not having a sense of humor…. and you of being a grump….
Dare you break out of the mold and develop a sense of humor now so deep into the battle?
🙂

Bernd Felsche
July 17, 2010 11:53 pm

Manitowoc… wow. I’d heard about that previously while researching my family tree.
Some cousins settled there initially in the mid-19th Century. I don’t think they would have liked the cold, coming from central Germany. A great flood of emigration to the USA at the time; often leaving villages largely abandoned.
There was a lack of food and various diseases such as typhoid and cholera rampant at the time. Lots of people died in transit; many even before they got to an Atlantic port.
I’m not looking forward to a little ice age.

Ian E
July 18, 2010 12:01 am

Looks like July has seen the lowest rate of ice decrease ‘ever’. Shouldn’t the warmistas, who were, as I recall, desperately excited by the previous month’s reverse behaviour, be celebrating and telling everyone who will listen that ‘It’s better than anyone thought’!

Martin Brumby
July 18, 2010 12:08 am

Yet another great feature on the web’s greatest site.
I’m reluctant to suggest other things you could do, Anthony. I can’t see how you find time to sleep. But perhaps someone else could help out by developing a page on our old (but unaccountably, now neglected) friend, the tropical troposphere hot spot!
Wow, it would be really cool to be able to sit back with a beer and some popcorn and watch the antics of that sucker! Real excitement there!

July 18, 2010 3:13 am

NOAA: Future of Arctic Sea Ice and Global Impacts
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/future/
“computer models predict that by 2035, the Arctic could be nearly sea ice-free in summer”
Hmm, now where have I seen that year 2035 number before?

bhanwara
July 18, 2010 3:45 am

How about credit where it is due?
http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2010/06/daily-graphs-and-maps.html
There are other older pages as well.

Roger Knights
July 18, 2010 3:48 am

Anthony: A suggestion. Underneath the JAXA thumbnail there is an extraneous blank line above the caption “Sea Ice.” This makes it hard to detect at first glance whether the caption refers to the image above or below it. (The other thumbnails lack this extraneous blank line.)

Roger Knights
July 18, 2010 3:49 am

Oops– I just noticed the “Mars Today” caption is also preceded by an extraneous blank line.

July 18, 2010 3:58 am

Lots of useful external links on this NIC IMS webpage:
http://www.natice.noaa.gov/ims/

Richard M
July 18, 2010 4:37 am

Maybe some volunteers with special knowledge could come up with other pages. E.g. and ENSO page (Bob?), or maybe a sea ice history page(Tony?), etc.
Thanks Anthony.

jackbenimble
July 18, 2010 5:59 am

Isn’t the Sea Ice Machine sort of like selling ice to an eskimo?

DirkH
July 18, 2010 6:05 am

kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:
July 17, 2010 at 10:18 pm
“[…]
From: sphaerica on July 17, 2010 at 2:40 pm
I’d strongly suggest adding the pole centered 30 day animation from Cryosphere Today.
On behalf of those of us on dial-up, I respectfully ask:
Are you freaking nuts?”
Now, sphaerica is a warmist concern troll and wants to sabotage Anthony’s endevour. Which is not terribly surprising; but it leads me to an interesting question:
*WHY* do warmist concern trolls want to prohibit people from seeing realtime information about sea ice? The sources Anthony links to are scientific organisations. Maybe an informed public is not in the best interest of the warmist cause?
The Xerox machines in Russia were as closely guarded as the missile sites…

Pamela Gray
July 18, 2010 7:34 am

I’m on dial up so can’t readily see which links you have included unless I stare at my screen for half an hour. Did you include this one? And the AO graph?
http://www.aari.nw.ru/clgmi/forecast/show_drift.asp?fign=0&lang=0

John from CA
July 18, 2010 7:44 am

Thanks Anthony
Here are a couple additional links.
National Ice Center Viewer
http://espcgis.nesdis.noaa.gov/website/ssdsnow/viewer.htm
Environment Canada – Canadian Ice Service
main page: http://ice-glaces.ec.gc.ca/app/WsvPageDsp.cfm
Key To Canadian Ice Service Sea Ice Symbols
http://ice-glaces.ec.gc.ca/App/WsvPageDsp.cfm?Lang=eng&lnid=76&ScndLvl=no&ID=11030
or on the National Ice Center web site:
http://www.natice.noaa.gov/products/egg_code.html
Broadcast Schedules For Arctic Ice and Marine Conditions
Canadian Coast Guard (Radio Aids to Marine Navigation):
http://www.ccg-gcc.gc.ca/eng/CCG/MCTS_Radio_Aids
Alaska Marine VHF Voice:
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/akvhfv.htm
NOAA MF/HF Voice – 4125 kHz:
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/noaahfv.htm
NOAA Weather Radio at U.S. Coast Guard Sites in Alaska:
http://www.nws.noaa.gov/om/marine/aknwr.htm

SouthAmericanGirls
July 18, 2010 8:43 am

SUPERB IDEA! This is EXACTLY the kind of information that will obliterate the AGW pseudoscience: Sea ice involves millions of kilometers; they can correct their temperature databases to obliterate the 1930s warming, the Medieval Warm Period and other old warmer periods, they can superheat the 200os with their corrections but they can do little corrections to SATELLITE PHOTOGRAPHS that show millions square kilometerss of sea ice.
I thing sea ice is the MOST IMPORTANT SINGLE FACT that will show millions that the “satanic co2” AGW theory is pseudoscience.
WattsUpWithThat is the most popular ¿climate? science blog on the planet. This SEA ICE page should have a prominent place in the blog, so people can come and SEE themselves those millions kilometers and doing so the AGW collapse will come sooner.

etudiant
July 18, 2010 9:16 am

Excellent idea to have the Sea Ice pages combined in one link. Thank you!
One small request:
The JAXA chart has a daily ice cover area estimate, in square km. Could that please be included on your summary page as well?

Editor
July 18, 2010 2:33 pm

geo Anthony says:
July 17, 2010 at 1:14 pm

REPLY: maybe somebody could host some code on an external server that could generate a live image URL for WUWT? WP.com limits even basic coding in pages. -Anthony

I just set up a crontab job to update the latest cryosphere Arctic image to
http://home.comcast.net/~ewerme/wuwt/cryo_latest.jpg and the comparison to the same date from 2007 at http://home.comcast.net/~ewerme/wuwt/cryo_compare.jpg
I need to do some futzing to run it around the time new images show up, a topic I need to learn a bit more about.
I’ll send you Email about getting them uploaded to WUWT.
(Readers – I don’t intend these URLs to be more than proof-of-concept, so don’t expect them to last.)
-Ric

Editor
July 18, 2010 2:39 pm

Oops – make that second link be to the .png file, i.e.
http://home.comcast.net/~ewerme/wuwt/cryo_compare.png

jorgekafkazar
July 18, 2010 5:08 pm

Scott Covert says: “How about a solar page?”
There’s already a lot of solar data on Solarcycle24.com. Between that, Leif’s site (http://www.leif.org/research/), and Jan Janssen’s site (http://users.telenet.be/j.janssens/SC24.html), I think it’s well covered. There may be better places to fritter your afternoons away. A solar FAQ page might be helpful, in lieu of Leif having to answer the same dumb questions again and again and again.

July 18, 2010 9:03 pm

Skinny-dipping, anyone? 🙂

kwik
July 18, 2010 11:39 pm

Philip Mulholland says:
July 18, 2010 at 3:13 am
“Hmm, now where have I seen that year 2035 number before?”
Wasnt it some dubious “Love Guru” from India? What was his name again?

anna v
July 19, 2010 5:34 am

It is freezing at the north pole 🙂
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/npole/2010/images/noaa2-2010-0719-071708.jpg
One can get the whole gallery from noaa,
http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/npole/gallery_np_selectall.php
go to current and choose your dates.

anna v
July 19, 2010 5:37 am

tudiant says:
July 18, 2010 at 9:16 am
Excellent idea to have the Sea Ice pages combined in one link. Thank you!
One small request:
The JAXA chart has a daily ice cover area estimate, in square km. Could that please be included on your summary page as well?

I second the motion. here is the link:
http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/seaice/extent/AMSRE_Sea_Ice_Area.png

Beth Cooper
July 19, 2010 6:31 am

How altruistic of you to spend your Saturday preparing this, Anthony. An example of a kind heart in a cold world.

geo
July 20, 2010 11:41 am

I’m finding this page pretty useful and time-saving. I’d be interested in seeing how much it adds to WUWT stats after a month or so. Surely I’m not the only OCD ice-watcher (Yes, I’m looking at you, and you, and you, and most especially YOU).
REPLY: FYI – Repeat hits from same IP don’t count in the traffic stats. -Anthony

geo
July 21, 2010 6:17 am

Another suggestion for this page: The AO index. Negatives tend to be good for keeping ice in the central core; positives tend to be not-so-good for that: http://www.cpc.noaa.gov/products/precip/CWlink/daily_ao_index/ao.obs.gif

geo
July 22, 2010 4:30 pm

Thank you to Ric Werme and Anthony for making the Cryosphere comparos available now too. 🙂

Daryl M
July 24, 2010 10:06 am

How about using this page from NSIDC instead? It shows +/- 2 SD on the average.
http://nsidc.org/data/seaice_index/images/daily_images/N_stddev_timeseries.png

Reference
July 28, 2010 5:35 pm

Anthony
How about adding the NPEO Home Page?
http://psc.apl.washington.edu/northpole/
COMMENT: Done, and thanks for the link! – the mods

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