Unbelievable pollution in China – yet the US is the baddie at Copenhagen

We’ve made so much progress in the USA. 75 years ago, we may have witnessed some scenes like this in today’s China. Unfortunately, the de-industrialization of the west just moved the western problems of the past to a country that doesn’t seem to care much about pollution control.

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At the junction of Ningxia province and Inner Mongolia province, I saw a tall chimney puffing out golden smoke covering the blue sky, large tracts of the grassland have become industrial waste dumps; unbearable foul smell made people want to cough; Surging industrial sewage flowed into the Yellow River…”

– Lu Guang

Or how about his one?

In Inner Mongolia there were 2 “black dragons” from the Lasengmiao Power Plant (内蒙古拉僧庙发电厂) covering the nearby villages. July 26, 2005

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See the complete photo essay on pollution in China here.

Be thankful for what you have, and show this to your favorite environmentalist the next time he/she complains about the pollution sins of western civilization.

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gt

As a Chinese I am saddened by these pictures. China’s environmental problems are REAL, SERIOUS, and IMMINENT. Global warming is the least of their concern. I am all for any air pollution control technologies that can solve any part of the problem, regardless of how much CO2 they will create. AGW, even if it truly exists, is the least of Chinese’s concern.

Patrick Davis

When you cross the border from Hong Kong into “Chanzen”, you cross over a small enclosed brigde over a small stream. The air is heavy with a smell that I can only decribe as an “engineering/garage/car body and paint workshop”. The water looked stagnent and polluted.

SamG

Some of those pictures look enhanced.

Steve S.

If it was really about saving the planet from AGW the entire AGW movement would be aimed at China instead of the assinine litany of left wing policies riding the AGW train.

mr.artday

Last I heard, the Chinese were getting rid of the really toxic chemical waste from the manufacture of Sacred Green Solar Cells by trucking it out to farmland and school grounds and dumping it. I guess it will take take several Donora PAs and Bhopals to rein such practices in.

Alvin

Yet all the environmentalists are in the USA trying to shut us down.

Adam from Kansas

Oh g…….words can’t describe this mess. How do the people in these areas actually survive (and I’m aware there’s cleaner areas of China as well)?
On another pollution related story, I read aging sewage plants in Iowa are dumping sewage into many streams which millions use as drinking water, but the pictures here show a most severe sewage problem in China.
It could take decades to clean up this mess considering the severity.

Garacka

In the U.S. the CO2 is white but in China it’s yellow and black. Does that mean it can take on different colors in different places?
I know. I know. I shouldn’t have asked that question because some wacko is now going to come along and say that CO2 is invisible.

Pamela Gray

If there ever was a posterboy for getting off this thing about CO2 and getting on with solving real pollution, those pictures have to be it. Those people over there more than likely wished they HAD some CO2 to breath out.

Ron de Haan

It will cost a fraction of the budged planned to spend on C&T and climate change (3 trillion dollar) to clean up the the air, land and water in China.
We have the technology, the man power, why not apply?
Well, our entire political establishment has gone bunkers.
The UN has pointed it’s finger to the free world and the free world must be eradicated. All the collaborators that have infiltrated our societies are in place, from the Presidency to the prep schools.
These people have other priorities and these priorities are not in the interests of the people, no matter where they live, it’s not in the interest of our environment.
It’s about a scrupulous elite with an unsatisfiable hunger for individual wealth and power.

John F. Hultquist

The U. S. of A. went through a high pollution phase and some think not enough has been done. Consider the coke, iron, and steel Pittsburgh region of the 1940s, or the smelters in Northern Idaho, or the early potato processing in Southern Idaho. Such things are mostly gone – cleaned up or unfortunately simply moved to such places as China. These things take strong political leadership, money, and time. All of which the U. S. of A. is now intent on squandering on the global warming issue when there are real serious problems that should be addressed.
Consider just one:
http://www.earthtimes.org/articles/show/294264,unicef-malnutrition-stunts-growth-in-200-million-children.html

crosspatch

Yeah, the wackos amaze me in that they want greater and greater restrictions on the US while China seems to be exempt from just about every international pollution accord there is.
They have reached the point of diminishing returns in the US. Continued scrubbing of Earth’s clean spot isn’t going to make the rest of the planet any cleaner. Our dirtiest cities are like national parks compared to places in China, India, and Brazil.
But it is part of this odd environmental narcissism that pervades the “environmental” movement where they seem to have a belief that the country with the greatest economic output “must” be a major polluter or something. They rationalize it with the logic that “every little bit makes a difference”, but it doesn’t. Increasing environmental regulations in the US would make a difference that could not even be measured because of the rate of increase in other places will swamp it.
Oregon is a great example. They have put all these regulations in place to reduce CO2 emissions. It will not make an iota of difference. Oregon has a goal to reduce CO2 emissions by 300,000 metric tons per year. China is increasing emissions at the rate of 300,000,000 metric tons per year. If Oregon reached its goal, it will have been surpassed 1000 times by China. In the overall scheme of things, Oregon amounts to a raindrop in the ocean, it can not even be measured. If it takes Oregon 5 years to do that, China will have increased her emissions by 1,500,000,000 tons at the current rate of increase. These people have absolutely no concept of the scale of what they are talking about.
They delude themselves into believing that a project that costs billions of dollars makes any difference when it doesn’t amount to anything at all except extracting money from people’s pockets and possibly making some FEEL better. It doesn’t actually accomplish anything at all.
If they want to do something, why don’t they protest pollution in China? Good luck trying.

John F. Hultquist

Adam from Kansas (21:09:27) : Iowa, sewage, population
Iowa only has about 3 M people so I think for your statement to be true we will have to assume that the Iowa rivers drain into the Mississippi River and the folks on its banks drink Iowa sewage.
Early in the 1900s my grandparent’s “farm” had an outhouse over an intermittent stream. When the stream was not flowing the waste piled up under the hole and then in the spring it was flushed down the creek with the early snow melt. That was in NW Pennsylvania and the water eventually went to the Allegheny, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers.

John F. Hultquist

Ron, you meant “bonkers”, right?
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=bonkers

crosspatch

Another example,
You could render the UK completely carbon neutral. Shoot every single person and domestic animal in the country, turn off every power plant, turn the entire British Isles into a nature reserve and China will make up the difference in CO2 emissions in 18 months. Every 18 months China adds as much as the entire UK emits.
Until they get serious about China, India, and Brazil we are just fooling around and fooling ourselves. Trouble is that 50% of the population of the planet lives in China and India. The other 50% is scattered over all the rest of Asia, Europe, Africa, South America, Australia, and North America. The US has only 2.5% to 3% of the world’s population. It is NOT sustainable to try to make 3% of the population offset the output of 97% of the population.

Doug in Seattle

Cancer villages? This must be propaganda. The Chinese are a benevolent people. Their leaders would never allow such horrors to be allowed.

Evan Jones

I think we need to keep our perspective. Right now, poverty kills a heck of a lot more in China than does pollution. In a decade or two, that equation will have reversed, at which point China will deal with their air pollution on their own and without outside help or international agreement.
Until then, they will not. It’s as simple as that. When the Chinese rich up they will clean up, just as every first-world country has done.

crosspatch

When the Chinese rich up they will clean up, just as every first-world country has done.

I agree with that to a great extent. But in the meantime, lets not pretend that setting carbon quotas on individuals in the Western world is going to make any difference.

Paul Vaughan

gt (20:42:52) “As a Chinese I am saddened by these pictures. China’s environmental problems are REAL, SERIOUS, and IMMINENT. Global warming is the least of their concern. I am all for any air pollution control technologies that can solve any part of the problem, regardless of how much CO2 they will create. AGW, even if it truly exists, is the least of Chinese’s concern.”
Western politicians of all political stripes have miscalculated the gravity of this reality.

evanmjones (21:53:21) : “…When the Chinese rich up they will clean up…”
That is worthy of Quote of the Year, Evan.
It encapsulates a great number of truths with brilliant simplicity.
Much of this thread to date has impressed me… even inspired… so thanks to you all.
And, Anthony, make a mental note of Evan’s line for consideration?

Mariss Freimanis

Well, that’s what all the industrialized world looked like in 1850 to 1950. Many thousands probably died every year but civilization continued and brought us everything we have today. We in the West moved our pollution elsewhere starting in the 1960s. We got clean air, the goods we wanted but at the expense of a growing trade deficit. Helpful was there was always another country with intelligent, skilled but poor citizens. They would breathe the the orange smoke from the smokestacks in exchange for the money they earned.
The money earned raised the living standard of the people. Orange smoke became unacceptable and costs were incurred to stop the pollution. These same costs made the products manufactured for export too expensive. People in the West moved on to another, poorer country and the process repeated.
Were these people exploited by this Western capitalism? It depends on your interpretation. Many thousands died but millions benefited from the rise in the standard of living. It started with Germany and Japan in the 1950s. Neither has orange colored smokestacks today and both have a standard of living equal to their original exploiters.
This leapfrogging of country to country exploitation continued from the 1950s until today. Today it’s China that has an intelligent, hard working work-force willing to put up with toxic smoke from smokestacks. Your standard of living is rising and at some point you will not put up with the pollution. When and how is up to you. Remember, the first orange smokestacks were in Britain and the US a hundred years ago.
What’s interesting to me is what happens afterward. China is the last country to “benefit” from this over half-century paradigm. The earth is finite and there is no other country left of any significance to leapfrog to. It ends here.
Economically it means the West will no longer be able to pass on the cost of its needs to third-world countries, meaning the West will very soon have to carry the full burden of the costs the goods they require. This will be a huge jolt and a dislocation to the expected manner of doing things. The last 60 years of seeming prosperity has been based on a derivative function.
Long and short, there is nothing after China. Things will change in a big way after that.
Mariss

p.g.sharrow "PG"

Strong central government bureaucracy always destroys the civilization it guides, always! Poor people always destroy their environment, always. Free people that can create wealth and control it’s use, always clean up and improve their environment, always.
The Chinese have had nearly 4,000 years to perfect the art of bureaucrats in strangling advancement and I have great faith in their ability to end the present great leap forward fairly soon. As the Soviet Union collapsed in great environmental damage, so will the Chinese. They are at the top of this advancement right now.
The only way that I have seen that works on bureaucracies is to starve them of funding and ignore their ravenous demands for more power.

Gary Indiana? (The second photo)
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savethesharks

Pamela Gray (21:26:11) :
If there ever was a posterboy for getting off this thing about CO2 and getting on with solving real pollution, those pictures have to be it. Those people over there more than likely wished they HAD some CO2 to breath out.

YES. Two separate arguments here: pollution and “pollution”-forced warming.
Are homo sapiens polluting the planet? Yes. AGP Anthropogenic Global Pollution (think the Texas-sized Pacific Trash Gyre).
If the AGW people would focus on *solvable* problems, then I might be *somewhat* on board.
But they don’t stop with the solvable problem.
Then then make the illogical jump FIRST: Ignoring the pollution….they focus on CO2 (which is not a pollutant)…
…and then SECOND: they jump the next chasm by making CO2 the main cause of “global warming”.
Is it not so plain to see to any reasonable mind, as to why this argument is so ****ed up????
Two crazy, CRAZY jumps in logic (and without statistically significant scientific evidence in both, I might add).
And then the REAL pollution problems, in the smokescreen of the bull***t, are thrown under the bus!!!
I have one thing to say:
Coal dust IS. CO2 is not!
And I am sure the folks in the PAC NW who are taking in the hydrologic cycle forcing of excess mercury, lead, and other poisons through the salmon and the water supply, thanks to China, know this all too well.
Why is this so hard to understand???
Where is Al Gore and all of these other talking heads on these issues???
Where are they???
It is truly a life safety issue, and they are ignoring the real problems, because they are too stupid to see the forest through the trees!!
Chris
Norfolk, VA, USA

Life magazine back in the 1960s had some amazing photos of American pollution. I did a bit of a search, and there are some sites that describe the contents but not to the detail to let identify which issues have the photos I remember best:
Sheets or white shirts on a clothes line, I think in Chicago, that had been abandoned and picked up enough soot to be dark gray. (While there were complaints about what we’d call “Cherry picking”, businessmen in Pittsburgh PA in the 1940s would bring in a new shirt to put on after lunch.)
Mounds of suds floating down a Ohio(?) river from washing machine gray water that wasn’t treated much or at all.
And of course, the Cuyahoga River near Cleveland after it caught fire. (While an iconic event, some people downplay it as only caught fire twice. However, it did provide a lot of impetus to get serious about cleaning things up. It may also have led to Cleveland being a dumping ground for stand up comics.)
By the time I got to Pittsburgh for college in 1968 they had cleaned up the particulate pollution quite a bit, but SO2 and NOx was still pretty bad. After bicycling home late at night my shirt would smell like a wood fire.
A frequent nighttime occurrence was the air inversion that let crud from the steel mills flow up Panther Hollow and then engulf the CMU campus. We always looked forward to steelworker strikes and the cleaner air they brought.
I haven’t been back frequently, but the last time I was there several of the the buildings had been cleaned a look a lot more attractive with the layer of black grime removed. A building on campus was cleaned before I left, I hand never taken note of the ceramic tile thistles that lined the top of the exterior walls.
Still, nothing quite equals some of those China shots.

pat

Surely this is first Bush’s fault, then that of white Americans.

savethesharks

Crosspatch: “In the overall scheme of things, Oregon amounts to a raindrop in the ocean, it can not even be measured. If it takes Oregon 5 years to do that, China will have increased her emissions by 1,500,000,000 tons at the current rate of increase. These people have absolutely no concept of the scale of what they are talking about.”
Great points. And the vast, beautiful state of Oregon, ironically, is inheriting some of China’s worst airborne pollutants, thanks to the Westerlies.
Chris
Norfolk, VA, USA

David Alan

That picture reminds me of story, I once read in Readers Digest, growing up as a child. A small town, nestled in a Pa. valley, had a coal plant. On a cold and foggy night, a low pressure system trapped the blackened soot from the plant, and killed several dozen people in the process.
Events such as that and others like it, helped create the EPA and impose regulations to reduce harmful particulates. The reduction of harmful emissions has greatly increased the air quality we now enjoy.
Thirty years ago, when I lived in Pasadena, air quality was very poor. The chemical plants along the bayou, had givin the city a dirty nickname, Stinkadena.
If one was to drive toward Houston, from any direction, a visible brownish-grey haze, smog, incapsulated the city. I’m sure many cities looked that way.
I moved from that awful stench of a city and moved to Alaska, back in ’83, and only now had recently moved back to Houston.
One of the first things I immediately noticed was the quality of air surrounding the city. The smog was gone. The air, traveling from the plants, over to my mothers house, no longer carried the stench of industry.
The EPA had done its job. And now I’m afraid that same agency, which did much to improve the quality of life we now enjoy, is embarking on a journey to insanity.
It wasn’t enough to help regulate emissions, and now with their extraordinary powers, wish to control a substance, that the oceans of the world, emit naturally.
If the EPA and the U.S. Gov’t is truly concerned about OUR quality of life, reductions by other countries should reflect our own current policies.
Before we engage in any global discussions regarding emission reductions, nations like China, must achieve reductions in emissions, that we now currently impose upon ourselves.
Any further capturing of CO2 seems almost ludicrous on our part, while other nations, without our current level of restrictions, would only admit to some regulation, but not on par with our own.
It is a fools journey.

David Ball

I understand Maurice Strong lives there. He has tons o’ cash, why isn’t he doing something about it? World’s greatest environmentalist my foot. It is because he knows that once the North American countries have committed fiduciary suicide, China will be where it’s at. Creature comforts and all.

rbateman

The pictures look exaclty like what was found in the Eastern Bloc countries after the collapse of the Soviet Union.
And to think it all started with Most Favored Nation status.
How’s that working out?
We have 2 Free Trade Agreements in Asia, they have 139 in the US.
I thought so.
So, what is AGW’s ultimate goal? Pay reparations, turn the countryside into fuedal states and “I wanna be like Hu Jintao, What you worried about?”.
The pictures above may be a glimpse of what the US will look like in 20 years after the Agenda has seized power.
Does anyone really believe they care about pollution after they made C02 into thier pet scapegoat?

David Alan

All I can say is brilliant minds think alike.
Most of us all had similar reactions from a single picture.
Quite serendipitous.

Rick Sharp

I was in a taxi in Beijing in the summertime. I took a deep breath and it felt just like the old days in L.A. Beijing air in the summertime is worse than L.A. air in the 60s.
Flying from Beijing up north to Shenzhen down by Hong Kong all you see when you look down is brown air.

crosspatch

“Life magazine back in the 1960s had some amazing photos of American pollution. ”
Back in about 1968 or maybe 1969, my Dad drove us to see or grandparents in the midwest. We were driving across Pennsylvania and I remember asking my Dad what that horrible smell was. My eyes were burning and it smelled awful. He said “Pittsburgh”. We still had 50 miles to go before we got there. When we got there, all I can remember is a very hazy, foggy, and horribly stinky gray place with soot all over everything. Couldn’t see very far because of all the haze. The sun was a bluish spot in the sky.
Eastern Europe was the same way until the 1990’s. Germany spent billions on the industrial infrastructure of East Germany. When I lived in Berlin in the early 1980’s the tree leaves would be covered with soot and the smell of coal smoke was thick in the air, particularly on foggy mornings.
But I don’t believe I have seen anything like what is going on in China.
For example this image of Sakurajima volcano in Japan shows a plume of ash drifting to the Southwest from the volcano but the majority of that wispy haze to the North of the plume is pollution from China.
If you think the US is getting a dose of Chinese pollution, it is nothing compared to what Japan is getting.

Tenuc

We in the West are responsible for what’s happenig in China and India.
It is Western big businesses that profiteered by moving production to these countries to get lower production costs – cheap labour & low cost factories which didn’t have to conform to Western safety and pollution regulations.
In the end it is us, the consumers who buy these cheap goods, which still bear historic and familiar brand names, who are responsible. Without our money, this would never have happened.
So the solution to the problem is easy. Support your own local manufacturing base and only buy goods made in your own country. We can all do our small bit to solve this problem.

Max

I toured eastern Europe just after the Iron Curtain fell, and the sight that most struck me was the horrible degree of environmental destruction everywhere, both rural and urban. Many streams and broad areas of open land were so contaminated as to be beyond safe use. Cities and towns looked grimy and smelled like paint shacks.
I was told that communist policy was “sweep it under the rug.” Government mandated production quotas had to be met, the bureaucrats simply didn’t care, and the people complained at their peril. I returned 10 years after liberation and was amazed at how much the place had been cleaned up.
History is repeating itself in China. Political repression and socialist state planning result in ecological calamity that makes third-world kleptocracies look pristine by comparison.

Gene Nemetz

evanmjones (21:53:21) :
I think we need to keep our perspective. Right now, poverty kills a heck of a lot more in China than does pollution.
Work accidents do too.

Gene Nemetz

Garacka (21:21:30) :
I know. I know. I shouldn’t have asked that question because some wacko is now going to come along and say that CO2 is invisible.
I am that wacko—co2 is invisible!! 😉

I think that these chimneys and other sources create aerosols which help to cool the atmosphere, so the industrial and political leaders of China could be awarded by the warriors against global warming – they could even get the Lenin award if not the Stalin award.

tallbloke

“the de-industrialization of the west just moved the western problems of the past to a country that doesn’t seem to care much about pollution control.”
Or cares about pollution control about as much as the industrialized west did.
“show this to your favorite environmentalist the next time he/she complains about the pollution sins of western civilization.”
The complaints of grassroots environmental movements are the reason why the contrast is so stark. Complaints don’t get listened to in totalitarian regimes, which is why the western industrialists moved their production there.
I can imagine that the Chinese long term plan is to move their industrial production back to the west once they have bought out our bankrupted countries.
The wheel turns.

Neven

The West has moved its pollution to China, which now produces toys for the West. But we are not responsible. We are not responsible for anything. It’s Them that are responsible.

EW

The UN has pointed it’s finger to the free world and the free world must be eradicated.
?? I thought that these ideas about AGW and fighting CO2 originated in the free world who is doing all of it to itself. Countries like China, India and Brazil are rather reluctant to jump on that bandwagon.

This is what I love about the Greens, they just bury their heads in the sand and shout “la, la, la, la, la, la, I cannot hear you”, to insulate themselves from the rigours of the real wold.
They were so pleased with themselves, for shutting down the dirty industries in Britain. But now look what they have created: unemployment in Britain and ten-times as much pollution in the East. Never mind, its NIMBY.
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Vincent

There have been a number of proposals in the media recently, to do with pumping sulphate aerosols into the atmosphere to cool the planet. Based on that logic, then these photographs of factories belching yellow sulphur clouds must be joy to the eyes of these warmists.
CO2= bad, Sulphur fumes = good.

.
And this does not show the 3,000 deaths a year in the coal mining industry. And this was a ‘good’ year – I have seen previous reports as high as 6,000.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/11/world/asia/11coal.html
While all industrial deaths in China stand at about 100,000 a year.
http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2009-01/17/content_7405924.htm
You know that bright red colour that the Chinese like to use on the boxes of their products. It is not dye, it is the blood of Chinese workers.
Have a nice shopping day, with all those Chinese goods….
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P Gosselin

Those steps that the environmentalists are taking us up are not the stairway to heaven, rather they are the steps up the gallows.
Unfortunately, us Europeans and Americans are not going to realise this until we’re dangling from the end of a rope, gasping for air.
Talk about a lot of people being duped. I don’t see them waking up from their trance early enough.

MartinGAtkins

Garacka (21:21:30) :
In the U.S. the CO2 is white but in China it’s yellow and black. Does that mean it can take on different colors in different places?
I know. I know. I shouldn’t have asked that question because some wacko is now going to come along and say that CO2 is invisible.

[snip] Having said that even you deserve some guidance. CO2 is a colourless gas.
What you are describing is the smoke emitted after combustion and one of it’s components is CO2 but that is not what is visible to you. The visible part of the emission is a whole lot different things depending on how the fuel is treated before burning, how it’s burned and the treatment of the emissions before being released.
The difference in appearance between USA and Chinese exhausts are probably due to all the above being carefully controlled in the US and not in China.
So why is one white and the other a yellowish black? The black is usually what’s know as volatile carbon compounds or unburned fuel due to low temperature and lack of oxygen at the furnace face. It’s somewhat the same for the yellow although this also indicates sulphur, ash and a whole lot of other crap you don’t want floating about. It indicates the the last part (treatment of the emissions before being released) and the first part (how the fuel is treated before burning) is deficient.
Here I have made generalizations as the processes are complex. For further reading.
http://www.coalonline.org/site/coalonline/content/Viewer/81591/6247/6247_1.html/Fundamentals-of-coal-combustion
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Jimbo

evanmjones (21:53:21):
“I think we need to keep our perspective. Right now, poverty kills a heck of a lot more in China than does pollution. In a decade or two, that equation will have reversed, at which point China will deal with their air pollution on their own and without outside help or international agreement.”
I agree. Much of the industrial production from the USA and Europe has simply moved to China for reasons of cost / environmental restrictions and as a result the pollution has to a certain extent moved as well. If people in the west demand China to be ‘greener’ then they must be prepared to pay more for the goods they import from China. When they get richer then their own people will, as the West did, increasingly demand cleaner air. London smog comes to mind as well a endless other examples.
Jimbo

Martin Brumby

This is one of the results of the eco-fascists in the West imposing more and more unnecessary environMental regulation, loss of jobs which are exported to third world countries where this kind of thing is rampant.
If the environMentalists were more concerned to prevent genuine pollution problems around the world and spent less time worrying about harmless trace gas plant food, perhaps the sum of human happiness would increase.
And this isn’t just a polution problem.
I have been told by government coal mining safety inspectors that whilst the Chinese government is trying to reduce fatalities in Chinese coal mines to 3,500 per year, the true figure is believed to be ten times as many.
But no doubt the eco-fascists would think this was a GOOD thing.

helvio

Oh, and you shold also have added that CO2 is definitely *not* what you see in the pictures. CO2 is invisible, and whatever is golden or black is a mix of something else most certainly toxic. But you should remind people it is not the CO2 there that is the problem! Because people usually associate black smoke with pure CO2…

Tenuc

Martin Brumby (04:04:32) :
“This is one of the results of the eco-fascists in the West imposing more and more unnecessary environMental regulation, loss of jobs which are exported to third world countries where this kind of thing is rampant…”
I don’t agree with you. You and the rest of us in the Western world are to blame for buying cheap Chinese made goods.
The regulations have resulted in massive improvements to health, life-span, and a better quality of life from having a nice environment to live in.
If you want to do you’re bit to help the third world, start buying goods made in your own country. I know this can work as many big businesses in UK who out-source customer care-lines to the East are now bringing them back into the country as customers went for company’s providing local support.
So do your bit and start supporting your local industry. It will cost you a bit more, but the long-term benefits are vast. As individuals we are powerless, but if we choose to work together nothing can stop us.