Tag Archives: Water cycle

Who knew? Plants are ‘heavy water’ rain gauges

From the GFZ GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam, Helmholtz Centre  and the Varved D2O department: The water cycle amplifies abrupt climate change The role of the hydrological cycle during abrupt temperature changes is of prime importance for the actual impact of climate change … Continue reading

About these ads
Posted in Curious things, Paleoclimatology, Rainfall | Tagged , , , | 32 Comments

Geoengineering approaches to reduce climate change unlikely to succeed

From the EGU: Heavy rainfall events can be more common in a warmer world (Credit: Annett Junginger, distributed via imaggeo.egu.eu) Reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the planet’s surface by geoengineering may not undo climate change after all. Two German … Continue reading

Posted in Geoengineering | Tagged , , , , , , , | 38 Comments

Climate change is dominated by the water cycle, not carbon dioxide

Guest essay by Steve Goreham Originally published in The Washington Times Climate scientists are obsessed with carbon dioxide. The newly released Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) claims that “radiative forcing” from human-emitted CO2 is … Continue reading

Posted in IPCC, Oceans, PDO | Tagged , , , , | 138 Comments

New PR claim from Columbia extrapolates globally from a handfull of weather stations

From Columbia University , something that made my B.S. meter ping. My first thought was that evaporation pans aren’t new, going back to the beginning of the U.S. Weather Bureau  COOP network, so what is this all about? Typical standardized … Continue reading

Posted in hydroclimatology | Tagged , , | 42 Comments

The cure for anything is salt water—sweat, tears, or the sea.

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach There’s an interesting study in Science magazine, entitled “Ocean Salinities Reveal Strong Global Water Cycle Intensification During 1950 to 2000″ by Durack et al. (paywalled here, hereinafter D2012). The abstract of D2012 says: Fundamental thermodynamics … Continue reading

Posted in Salinity | Tagged , , , , , , , | 73 Comments