Now it’s the fungi carbon footprint that isn’t in climate models

From a long line of missing things in climate models and the University of Texas at Austin: Symbiotic fungi inhabiting plant roots have major impact on atmospheric carbon, scientists say AUSTIN, Texas — Microscopic fungi that live in plants’ roots play a major role in the storage and release of carbon from the soil into…

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Apparently, 4 degrees spells climate doom

One has to wonder though, since CO2 residence time has been said to be anywhere from  five year to hundreds, or even thousands of years, with no solid agreement yet, how they can be so sure of themselves? From the University of Cambridge 4 degree rise will end vegetation ‘carbon sink’ Latest climate and biosphere…

Hump Day Hilarity – DECC The Halls

Josh writes of this development in the UK: Ed Davey’s performance yesterday at the Energy and Climate Change Committee, posted here, was a mix of horror and farce. DECC seem to live in a make believe world where increases in costs cost less and policies which increase carbon emissions will somehow magically decrease them, one day, somehow, somewhere.…

Is the Bern Model Non-Physical?

Guest essay by Joe Born Is the Bern Model non-physical? Maybe, but not because it requires the atmosphere to partition its carbon content non-physically. A Bern Model for the response of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration to anthropogenic emissions is arrived at by adopting the values of , (and maybe ) that make the best fit…

Same headline, different year

Last year it was this headline, including a similar image: CO2 emissions reach record in 2012, driven by China This year, from the University of East Anglia, via Eurekalert, a press release with a basically same headline and with obligatory smokestacks shot at low sun angles, from the description at CSIRO’s “ScienceImage “Evening sunshine highlights…

Another modeling shortcoming…

From the Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies Carbon cycle models underestimate indirect role of animals Animal populations can have a far more significant impact on carbon storage and exchange in regional ecosystems than is typically recognized by global carbon models, according to a new paper authored by researchers at the Yale School of…