Fog May Be Icy

Guest Post by Willis Eschenbach

That was what the sign on the highway outside of Reno said, at any rate. I kept waiting for the corresponding sign saying

Ice May Be Foggy

But I haven’t seen it yet. We escaped from the Nugget Hotel, which was a good thing. They have a “Gilleys” bar there, complete with a Bikini Bullriding Competition. I tried to talk the gorgeous ex-fiancee into entering … she said I didn’t look all that good in a bikini even with a following wind, and I couldn’t argue on that score, so we rolled out to visit our friends in Imlay, Nevada.

The first curious sight was a house a few miles outside Reno. It was a white house, with a lovely green front lawn. It had a small tree in the yard, and a guitarscar in the garage, and a white picket fence around the whole thing.

And on all sides of that … nothing but high desert. Sagebrush and scrub and sand. It looked like the tornado from the Wizard of Oz had picked the house up from Illinois with every homey appurtenance, lawn, picket fence and all, and set it down in raw desert in Nevada …

(We’re in Idaho Falls now, staying by the Snake River.  I just heard the train whistle and I can feel the rumble … I do love that sound.)

Mostly what we did in Imlay was play music. One of my friends is a drummer, and one plays the guitar/fiddle/harmonica, so with Ellie we had an entire band. The music and the stories rolled on and on. They live up in the hills above the valley floor, the land there looks like this …

imlayI’d describe it as “medium bleak”. Then this morning we rolled out, stopping on the way at the strangest Indian memorial I’ve ever seen.

thunder mountainThere was a curious man, half American Indian and half Dutch, who was known as “Chief Thunder”. He decided to use “white man’s junk” to make a memorial … and what a memorial he made. He called it “excrescence art”, and the building looks like this …

thunder mountain IIHere’s a closeup of one small section:

thunder mountain 1The main construction materials appear to be glass bottles, wood, sweat, cement, mud, plaster, chewing gum, and I’m reluctant to ask what else. It is so bizarre I can’t begin to describe it, other than to say that the amount of work and the passion it represents are astounding. People never cease to amaze me.

From there, we went across an endless hot desert landscape. Temperatures were over 100°F (38°C). The most amazing thing was the repeated appearance of the forgotten stepchild of the emergent phenomena that regulate our planet’s surface temperature … the lowly dust devil. We saw big ones, and small ones. We saw ones that lasted only seconds, and a few that lasted many minutes.

Dust devils are one of the many emergent phenomena that appear when the surface is hot compared to the atmosphere. They move an unknown amount of energy from the surface up into the troposphere. As far as I know, there are very few studies of them. We don’t know how many there are, or how much energy they move.

But if you are looking across the desert landscape and you want to know where it is the hottest … that would be where the dust devils are busily at work, cooling the desert surface.

We passed by the valley of the Death Star, and went by a string of no less than 41 giant wind turbines on towers … surprisingly, nine of them were actually turning …

death star valleyAfter spending about six weeks going through the desert this afternoon, we finally made it to the Snake River Valley around Twin Falls. The Snake is one of my favorite rivers, in part because some of the time it runs down at the bottom of an outrageous canyon.

snake river canyonTonight we’re back in wetter country, in a log cabin in Idaho Falls …

log cabinIt’s a lovely little cabin, built the old-school way, not a kit. Another train is going by. The gorgeous ex-fiancee and I sat out on the picnic table and played guitar as the sun was going down. Life is good.

Tomorrow it’s off to Yellowstone, and then roll we north. The beat goes on … my thanks for the emails and suggestions, I fear I can’t answer them all, but do know that they are much appreciated. I’m tired, it’s 11PM, I’m off to shower and then to sleep.

All the best to all of you,

w.

 

About these ads

53 thoughts on “Fog May Be Icy

  1. Reportedly, Firehole Lake Road is closed in Yellowstone.

    http://www.nbcmontana.com/news/yellowstone-road-closed-after-road-surface-melts/26884582

    Personally, I think it is mostly due to a bad laying of the tack prior to paving, but you never know. If you can get a ground temperature there it would be handy. I’ve been told that CSS1H tack melts from 170°F to 190°F (anecdotal) but that impurities in the tank can mess with it’s characteristics. CSS1H tack is usually specified by many State and Federal contracts.

    It’s nothing highly important, just if you get a chance to take a surface temp it would be interesting to know what it it.

  2. We passed by the valley of the Death Star, and went by a string of no less than 41 giant wind turbines on towers … surprisingly, nine of them were actually turning …

    Could be a maintenance issue forcing the operators to push some juice through and spin them every now and then.

    With iron that heavy, if you leave rotating parts unrotated for too long, can the film of lubricant get squeezed out and the prolonged metal-to-metal contact will then result in pressure welding of the forced-together surfaces?

  3. Sounds like a nice trip.

    By the way, that’s not bleak, just stark. Welcome to Basin and Range country.

    If you want something more stark, try the Rabbit Hiils north of the Warner Rim in Lake County, Oregon. Or, just stick along Highway 395 from Lakeview to Riley.

    For bleak, drive through the Carson Sink on Highway 95 north of Fallon, NV, to I-80. Better in January than in July.

    There’s nothing better than a road trip through the Great American West!

  4. Fog May Be Icy

    I’ve read here before about these arid regions how, between evaporative cooling and the lack of sufficient greenhouse effect for heat retention at night due to the scarcity of that most-important greenhouse gas known as water vapor, you can make ice by leaving a pan of water on your roof at night.

    But the concept of the effect being so severe that water droplets in fog could cause a film of moisture on a car that would freeze up, that’s a new one for me.

  5. I spent the winter of ’64/’65 in Idaho Falls studying nuke power at the A1W prototype in the desert. My favorite was watching the jackrabbits in the bus headlights during the ride across the desert on the way to the reactor. By March of ’65 I was on station in the South China Sea. Getting combat pay for hanging with the Enterprise. And then there were the visits to Subic. All that is gone. Ships in the bone yard and Subic no longer a Navy port of call.

  6. Willis, be careful in Yellowstone: jus saw a picture in the news that some of the roads were melting, due to local (“global”?) warming… Anyway, have a nice trip and enjoy the impressive natural beauty of your country…

  7. Ice fog is not common here in the East, but it does occur. If you have to drive, and your car has been enveloped in ice fog, you will have a layer of frost that can be thick enough that scraping is slow and difficult. All that is needed to form the frost is a dew point at the ambient but sub-freezing temperature (i.e., saturated air) along with calm conditions. Driving can be troublesome if you have to go through the ice fog for some distance; ice can keep forming on your windows, so you have to keep the interior of the car quite warm to maintain visibility. Roads can be treacherous also.

  8. Willis,

    For future travel planning, this (second half of July) is the best time to visit Glacier Park in northern Montana. The roads will have been plowed open and there will still (except in the driest of years) be water flowing along rock walls and over waterfalls. Best of all, there probably won’t be much smoke in the air, as large fires in the surrounding forests generally don’t get going until August.

    For those who don’t have children in school, the best time to visit Yellowstone Park is in early September, right after Labor Day. There are almost no tourists, both because school has started and because most people don’t think of September as vacation time. Most of the attractions in the park remain open for a week or two after Labor Day.

    Because it’s getting cold in the mountains, the animals have begun to move down to the valleys. Bison and other large animals that were scarce during the summer become plentiful in September, but be wary — they’re powerful, on the prod because the rut is nearing, have poor eyesight, and possess very small brains. They’ll trample you without warning if you’re too close (their definition, not yours).

    The weather is generally good (65-70 degrees in the daytime), but September nights at 7000 feet altitude are quite cold (below freezing). Tuck an ice scraper into the pocket of your jacket and take both of them with you when you park your car and go into your hotel or cabin for the night.

    If you have the time, check out Teton National Park, just south of Yellowstone Park. It’s an entirely different experience (more like Glacier Park), with a rank of 13,000 foot mountains brooding over the valley. If you go down as far as Jackson Hole, you can ride the chairlift to the top of the ski slope. The view is reputed to be out of this world.

    I lived in Montana for most of the first 30 years of my life and have visited Glacier, Teton, and Yellowstone Parks many times. Montana’s a wonderful place with dazzling beauty, marvelous people, and a shortage of good-paying jobs. It still tugs at my heartstrings.

  9. Just shows you a missing simple punctuation mark can alter the meaning of a sentence!
    Fog may be icy
    Fog, may be icy
    Fog may be! Icy
    Fog May, be icy

  10. Willis. As a child in the 1940s, I remember my father treasured a volume of books called Pictorial Knowledge Illustrating wonderful pictures from all over the World, and which captured my imagination every time I opened the pages.. One of the few pictures I remember marvelling at was of a huge tree – I presume it was a giant redwood – with a girth so large that they had cut a road through it leaving a large part of the trunk on either side. A model T Ford was emerging from the trunk. The caption said it was in Yellowstone Park. USA. I have often wondered whether the tree is still alive, and although it is doubtful that you will traverse that particular road, it might be worth enquiring of the locals whether the tree is still standing,

  11. I wondered why the sign says “Deeth Starr” and not “Death Star”, so I looked it up. Surprisingly, what looks to be a “funny sign” is actually accurate.

    http://www.ghosttowns.com/states/nv/deeth.htm

    “There are several stories about how the settlement was named Deeth. One is that it was named after an early settler named Deeth. The other that the area was called Death for travelers without enough water would surely meet their death in the desert. In any event, the word death eventually became Deeth and that became the name of the town formed in 1869 when the Central Pacific Railroad was completed in the area. A post office opened in 1875 as did the first business—a saloon. Deeth’s population increased to thirty-one by 1880 with the addition of a railroad section crew, a warehouse, and a water tower. Deeth soon became the supply center and shipping point for the Starr and Ruby Valleys. (…)”

  12. George Lawson says:
    July 14, 2014 at 3:15 am
    Willis. As a child in the 1940s, I remember my father treasured a volume of books called Pictorial Knowledge Illustrating wonderful pictures from all over the World, and which captured my imagination every time I opened the pages.. One of the few pictures I remember marvelling at was of a huge tree – I presume it was a giant redwood – with a girth so large that they had cut a road through it leaving a large part of the trunk on either side. A model T Ford was emerging from the trunk. The caption said it was in Yellowstone Park. USA. I have often wondered whether the tree is still alive, and although it is doubtful that you will traverse that particular road, it might be worth enquiring of the locals whether the tree is still standing,

    If you mean a picture like these:

    That’s in Yosemite, not Yellowstone. The Wawona tree collapsed in 1969. I don’t remember seeing redwoods in Yellowstone. Lots of burnt conifer stumps from a massive fire a year or two before my visit, but not redwoods. The geysers and hot springs were gorgeous.

  13. Colonial@

    July 13, 2011, Latest ever opening for Going to the Sun Highway in Glacier. I had planned my summer tour around riding that road and was not able to stay out long enough.

  14. Thanks Willis.

    kadaka (KD Knoebel) says:
    July 14, 2014 at 12:15 am [...]
    With iron that heavy, if you leave rotating parts unrotated for too long, can the film of lubricant get squeezed out and the prolonged metal-to-metal contact will then result in pressure welding of the forced-together surfaces?
    —————————————
    Nope, not in any time frame that includes how long the tower will stand to allow for it. Bad things happen when rotating machinery doesn’t rotate, but pressure welding is not usually a concern.

    Rotating machines require lubrication and occasional overhaul when one can make the parts very large with lots of mass and operation is mostly continuous. Lubrication is extremely important. It is hard on a tall tower, and one cannot meet the other requirements up there on that tower either, which is why despite the fact wind blows, windmills suck.

  15. Katherine is right the tree was in Yosemite. It was a Sequoya not a Redwood, however, as Willis would know living amongst them.

  16. This part of the trip is familiar to me, as I have passed by a bit of it recently. Last summer I drove clear across the US and back again, though I stayed mostly North. I still prefer the West, even the scrub land. Willis and his lovely will be visiting one of the last frontiers of the West commonly known as the Little Switzerland Of America. I can’t wait.

  17. Thrill seekers to the core, little boys growing up in the country drop whatever they are doing and run into any dust devils which appear nearby, not quite sure if they’ll go spinning away like Toto, but doing their best to find out.

  18. I spend much of my “free” time in northern Nevada’s high desert area. Stark is my word for it, but the appeal for me is in its singularities. By this I mean one at a time. When I see a tree on the canyon side I am impelled to discover why. Green is scarce as is water. A trickle that runs a few hundred feet then sinks back into the earth can occupy me for hours. (My friends joke that I am easily amused). I have also spent many hours on high ground watching dust devils, and have had similar thoughts about the heat transfer abilities they have. On a very hot day (110 on the playa floor I have seen hundreds per hour, some a hundred feet or more across and a thousand feet high. Some have winds strong enough to do damage. I have seen buildings damaged and structures toppled. I have seen debris carried hundreds of feet in the air and then fall back to earth. On a local scale the heat displacement must be measurable, and would make a great research project for a young desert rat majoring in earth science at the wonderful University of Nevada Reno. If not I might have to undertake the task myself .

  19. cal smith says:
    July 14, 2014 at 6:17 am

    Katherine is right the tree was in Yosemite. It was a Sequoya not a Redwood, however, as Willis would know living amongst them
    ==============================================================
    Redwood trees are coastal in their habitat. The moisture off of the oceans is important for their health. I have heard that several redwood trees were found in the Sierra,s north of highway 80. Perhaps someone planted a few back in the late 1800s. The only other country where redwoods are found is in China.

  20. If you have not been there yet I would recommend going to stand on the shore of Lake McDonald on the western end of Going-to-the-Sun Road. Read the placard placed by the government about the glacial lake, how deep it is, etc. The deep rich blue color of the water and how fast it drops off. And then think how anyone could use the term climate change den**r and mean it. Mind boggling.

  21. I’m glad to see that an old cowboy like you knows when to “Let’er Buck!!” It was Montana’s Bob Fletcher who wrote, ““Civilization is a wonderful thing, according to some people.”

  22. That Indian memorial building reminds me of the Watts towers, wonder if they are still there?

  23. latecommer2014 says:
    July 14, 2014 at 7:32 am

    “On a local scale the heat displacement [from dust devils] must be measurable, and would make a great research project for a young desert rat majoring in earth science at the wonderful University of Nevada Reno. If not I might have to undertake the task myself .”
    _____________________
    Maybe a high resolution, high frame rate, thermal imaging video system would be the ticket.

  24. Try being near Eielson Air Force Base anywhere between December and March. You will quickly appreciate the meaning of ice fog.

    But I can’t recommend making the trip just then. The ice on the Tanana River is still solid

  25. GP Hanner -
    Ice fog and fog that may ice are different things. Ice fog is already frozen, happens at single digit F and lower temperatures and doesn’t build up on surfaces. Fog that may ice is in the form of supercooled liquid that freezes when disturbed. It happens around 30-32*F and will build up on surfaces. Fog that ices is more hazardous for travelling than ice fog.

  26. Michael Fox says:
    July 14, 2014 at 12:16 am

    … Lakeview to Riley. ….

    That is a great stretch of road! Outside of Oregon not many people but cowboys, geologists and archaeologists are aware of Riley. Two buildings counting the store. What’s really intersting around there is the abundance of underground water. The Wagon Tire valley is an interesting stretch to the south.

  27. goldminor says:
    July 14, 2014 at 7:52 am

    cal smith says:
    July 14, 2014 at 6:17 am

    Katherine is right the tree was in Yosemite. It was a Sequoya not a Redwood, however, as Willis would know living amongst them
    ==============================================================
    Redwood trees are coastal in their habitat. The moisture off of the oceans is important for their health. I have heard that several redwood trees were found in the Sierra,s north of highway 80. Perhaps someone planted a few back in the late 1800s. The only other country where redwoods are found is in China.

    Redwoods are Sequoia – Sequoia sempervirens. During the Pleistocene there were groves in the Sacramento Valley, and occasionally an enterprising excavator still encounters the occasional buried log. The Big Trees in the Sierra have been reassigned their own genus; Giganteodendron. The northernmost grove of Big Trees is east of Foresthill – south of I-80. There are only a handful. The Big Tree are survivors of the uplift of the Sierra and the accompanying volcanism and later glaciation. Since the seeds tend to germinate after fires, the biggest limit on them now is fire suppression.

  28. Katherine wrote:

    “I don’t remember seeing redwoods in Yellowstone.”

    That was because you were looking up, not down. There are fossil Sequoia in those parts, Eocene if I remember correctly. After all, the earth was much warmer throughout most of its history…

  29. Ask any hot air ballonist about emergent air flow… They fly in still air in the morning. Once the sun is up (after about 8 AM to 9 AM it starts in) the winds pick up as to the thermals and more. Folks try to be down and landed then head off to breakfast.

    The simple fact is that convection dominates the troposphere. IR is just not important to it.

    On redwoods: They are both coastal AND in the Sierras. Also found in Oregon. I’ve seen them growing in farms in New Zealand and, IIRC, Australia.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sequoia

    Sequoioideae, a three-genus subfamily of the cypress family.
    Sequoia (genus), a genus with one living and several fossil species.
    Sequoia sempervirens, coast redwood, found along the coast of California
    Sequoiadendron giganteum, giant sequoia, (the sequoia tree), found on the slopes of the Sierra Nevada of California
    Metasequoia, dawn redwood.

    Dawn redwood is the Chinese one, IIRC. Can drop needles in cold.

    So the Big Trees in the Sierra Nevada are redwoods too. As are the ones in Southern Oregon.

    http://www.redwoodhikes.com/Oregon/ORT.html

    Grew up in California. Saw my first drive through redwood at about 7 years old with Dad and a camper. Camped in the redwoods in the Sierras, and in Oregon… and at both Big Basin and Little Basin and…

  30. Willis,
    One of the most beautiful spots I have seen in your USA was a “town” called Joseph in Oregon, by the Wallowa mountains. They have a rodeo there in the last week of July. Very picturesque.

  31. If you like the Snake, check out the Rio Grande just west of Taos, NM. The gorge is 600 feet deep there. Then go up to Chama and ride the Cumbres and Toltec. Then drive down to Santa Fe thru Ghost Ranch.

    There is sooooooo much to see Out West.

  32. If you like dust devils, you might like this video of a sailboat in an ocean race being hit by a water spout.

    Willis, do you have anything on YouTube of you playing guitar?

  33. I met a Dutchman when I was hiking the Highline Trail in Glacier. He said he has been coming to the US two weeks a year for 25 years to do nothing but hike. I asked him how he liked the Highline Tail. He said, “it is the highlight of my hiking career.” I cannot agree more. Spectacular.

  34. Seriously, the ice fog around Reno in the winter can be nasty. Black ice all over the road.

  35. Reply to Wyguy ==> Yes, I though the same thing, that the Indian Monument looked like the Watts Towers. I attended high school in Watts, and visited the towers long before they were institutionalized as either a work of art or a cultural heritage site. The are still there — see their web site.

  36. Yes, Joseph is a pretty town. Lots of tourist shops and it sits at the end of Wallowa Lake. All the towns except that one are farmer towns. Most of us low landers don’t get up their often. Prices too high.

  37. The head of Wallowa Lake is where the summer tourists generally head. There is a campground and several nice lodgings. The lake is glacier fed so is very cold!

  38. Been in both cities yiou mentioned: Our oldest was born in Idaho Falls, in the hospital near the falls.

    Are you going to be able to get out to Craters of the Moon or the National Engineering Lab in the wastelands north of Idaho Falls?

    To all: Weather data information of the day.
    Each morning, on the Idaho Falls and nearby radio stations, the “4 inch soil temperatur”e is measured, reported, tracked, and repeatedduring each weatehr report.

    Why?

    A good question: They DO grow potatoes in Idaho – it is NOT a stereotype nor a derogatory remark! Potatoes CANNOT be planted into plowed dirt until the 4 inch soil has melted each spring, and the grown potatoes CANNOT be harvested until the 4 inch soil temperature has “firmed up” each fall by the approaching freezing ground, and the potatoes are stiff enough to be handled by the mechanical harvesters.

    Oh. All those irrigation ditches filled with water now and freely frozen? They’re frozen but good after a few nights of below 0 F weather. And your nose freezes and crinkles up with little icicles when the air temperature is less than -10 F.

  39. I love all those signs which say “Icy conditions may exist”. It’s great when road signs make philosophical statements! If ice formed briefly on a lonely desert road and no cars skidded on it, did it really ever exist?

  40. Amusing to see the “moderately bleak” countryside. I live at the edge of a coastal desert and would be thrilled to see the surrounding area so green, after 2013 gave 3 inches of rain and this year 2 inches, to translate to the archaic units. The area is however, in the tropical cyclone belt and has had as much as 8 inches of rain in a day. Plenty of dust devils to be seen here, especially in summer; they’re most prevalent in the afternoon as the seabreeze comes in, with as many as 7 or 8 visible at any one time on the right day. When the wind blows off the desert and it hits 30C+ dust devils are still possible in winter. At my last town, which was merely semi-arid, dust devils were also common and it was amusing to see them roll into town laden with dust, only to apparently disappear over town as the dust supply gave out, with only the occasional scrap of paper or leave to being carried aloft to show the dust devil was still around. Pilots who’ve always wondered why the Metar code for Dust Devil is PO will be thrilled to learn that it comes from the French “poussiere”, meaning dust. Fair enough, there’s no reason why all weather descriptors should come from English.

  41. Idaho Falls. Anything glowing in the dark? If I recall correctly in the 50′s a naval research nuclear (what else?) reactor exploded nearby killing three workers.

  42. I remember when “Chief Rolling Mountain Thunder” and his band of hippies were building all that, er, Native American art. Nice people, if a tad unbathed. Word was that was where you could get various mind-expanding Native American botanical products. I don’t remember exactly what led to them all leaving. Just incredible, though, that the state made a monument out of it.

  43. Welcome to Idaho Falls. One could spend at least 3 lives just exploring the country within 200 miles of us! Hope the Yellowstone crowds don’t get you down.

  44. Lol Willis, nobody has ever heard of Imlay, NV, exit 145. Did you happen to say hi to my mom who has lived there since 1984. My wife and I left in 96 to Alaska and only visit now. Small world. Thanks for the laugh.

  45. AKSurveyor says: July 14, 2014 at 6:20 pm

    ’84 would have been a few years after the Strode murders near Mt. Majuba. Lots of interesting happenings around Imlay / Mill City. For the record, the people there are the salt of the earth: proud, self-sufficient, tough, but would give you the shirt off their back.

  46. Go to Yellowstone in the winter, the thermal features are awesome. You can also tell where they all are due to the steam. The winter scenery is spectacular

  47. The Snake River canyon around Twin Falls should be seen from the bottom, not the top. If your return visit takes you back that way, take a few hours extra to find Niagra Springs. The aquifer gushes out of the middle of the canyon side. More interesting and upclose than Thousand Springs on old Hwy 30. If you only have a few minutes, stop at Malad Gorge State Park just off I-84 and peer into that canyon.

    I’m guessing you drove past the Ruby Mountains in NV. Lamoille Canyon is magical. How the hell did that get in the middle of Nevada? Best wishes.

  48. My “favorite” laugher from way back, PA DOT road signs they used to place along miles of single lane restriction for road construction especially on the interstates: “Temporary Inconvenience – Permanent Improvement”. As for ice, the signs used to be “Bridge freezes before road surface” which must have too confusing for people so now they say “Bridges may be icy.”

    Another laugher in Massachusetts. Somebody landed a huge contract to put up two signs, (each way), for every damn bridge and overpass in the entire commonwealth that reads: “Plows use caution” to which I mutter to myself… no they don’t!

  49. Why don’t we all put funds in to place billboards with basic climate change facts around America? I would donate $200.00.

    Such as- Twelve Urban Myths of Climate Change
    from material provided by Christopher Monckton:

    1.”Global warming is happening.”
    No: According to the RSS satellite record, there has been none for 17 years 10 months.
    2.”Warming is faster than we thought.”
    No: In 1990 the climate models predicted that global warming would happen twice as fast as it has.
    3.”There’s a 97 percent consensus.”
    No: Only 0.5 percent of the authors of 11,944 scientific papers on climate and related topics over the past 21 years said they agreed that most of the warming since 1950 was man-made.

    4.”Droughts are getting worse.”
    No: A recent paper in the learned journals shows the fraction of the world’s land under drought has fallen for 30 years.
    5.”Floods are getting worse.”
    No: The U.N.’s panel has said in two recent reports that there has been no particular change in the frequency or severity of floods worldwide.
    6.”Sea ice is melting.”
    No: It has grown to a new record high in the Antarctic, though the Arctic icecap has been shrinking a little in summer.
    7.”Sea level is rising dangerously.”
    No: Some satellites show it as rising a little, while others show it as falling.
    8.”Hurricanes are getting worse.”
    No: Their combined frequency, severity and duration has been at or near the lowest in the 35-year satellite record.
    9.”Global warming caused recent extreme weather.”
    No: There has been no warming recently, so it cannot have caused any extreme weather in recent years.
    10.”Global warming will reduce the number of redheads.”
    No: This is one of many scare stories about imaginary effects of warmer weather.
    11.”The ocean is acidifying.”
    No: The ocean remains decidedly alkaline, and there cannot be much change in its acid-base balance because it is buffered by the basalt rocks in which it lies.
    12.”It’s cheaper to act now, just in case.”
    No: It is 10-100 times costlier to try to prevent global warming today than to let it happen and pay the cost of adapting to it the day after tomorrow.
    Just about everything the mainstream news media say about global warming and its supposed dangers is the opposite of the truth.
    From the Heartland Conference, presentation by Lord Monckton. Note this is an excerpt I have edited into 12 points for presentation on this blog and also so that I can print it off for a presentation and poster I am making for a local community organization. Why not do the same? Read the original here. Read more here.

    [Reply: Read more where? ~ mod.]

  50. Rather than listing the 12 facts just list a catchy website on the board. I have a suggestion if you want to email me direct.

Comments are closed.