The tropical storm that just won’t die comes to life again

I’ll bet the next AGW claim we’ll see will be “tropical storms last longer”.

infrared image of Nadine

This infrared image was created from AIRS data on Sept. 28 at 0441 UTC (12:41 a.m. EDT) when Nadine was a strengthening tropical storm. Strongest thunderstorms with very cold cloud top temperatures (colder than -63F/-52 C) appear in purple surrounding the center of circulation. Credit: NASA JPL/Ed Olsen

NASA Sees Stubborn Nadine Intensify into a Hurricane Again

Infrared data from NASA’s Aqua satellite today, Sept. 28, revealed strong convection and thunderstorms have built up again in Tropical Storm Nadine as it moved over warm waters in the Eastern Atlantic Ocean. That convection strengthened Nadine back into a hurricane today. Nadine has lasted over two weeks, but is nowhere near breaking the record for longest-lived tropical cyclone.

NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over long-lived Nadine on Sept. 28 at 0441 UTC (12:41 a.m. EDT) when it was still a tropical storm and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument captured an infrared image of the storm. A large area of strong thunderstorms developed around the center of circulation with very cold cloud top temperatures colder than -63 Fahrenheit (-52 Celsius).

On Sept. 27, when NASA’s Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite passed overhead, convection was limited, and rainfall was light around the storm. The TRMM rainfall image showed Nadine had light rainfall surrounding most of the center of circulation. The heaviest intensity of about 20 mm/hour (~0.8 inches) appeared to be located just northeast of the center. That has changed 24 hours later as thunderstorms have re-developed and heavier rainfall appeared in a larger area of the storm.

At 11 a.m. on Sept. 28 Hurricane Nadine’s maximum sustained winds had climbed back up to hurricane strength and were near 75 mph (120 kmh). Twenty-four hours before, Nadine’s maximum sustained winds near 60 mph (95 kmh). Nadine is currently located near latitude 29.6 north and longitude 34.7 west, about 730 miles (1,175 km) southwest of the Azores Islands. Nadine is moving toward the northwest near 8 mph (13 kmh) and is expected to turn north-northwest over the next day.

Hurricane Nadine marked its seventeenth day of life today, Sept. 28, and is expected to continue lingering through the weekend of Sept. 29 and 30.

Nadine has a long way to go before breaking the record for longest life of a tropical cyclone. According to NOAA, in the Atlantic Ocean, Hurricane Ginger lasted 28 days in 1971. The Pacific Ocean holds the record, though as Hurricane/Typhoon John lasted 31 days. John was “born” in the Eastern North Pacific, crossed the International Dateline and moved through the Western North Pacific over 31 days during August and September 1994. Nadine, however, is in the top 50 longest-lasting tropical cyclones in either ocean basin.

Text credit: Rob Gutro
NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

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23 thoughts on “The tropical storm that just won’t die comes to life again

  1. “Nadine, honey is that you?
    Oh Nadine, honey is that you?
    Seems like everytime I see you darling
    You got something else to do….

    Mr Chuck Berry

  2. Here in UK I have a forecast that Nadine (or perhaps its remains) will impact UK at the end of the week! With gales and heavy rain. Followed by snow and cold temperatures!

    Ever since the wretched Labour government with Brown as Prime Minister passed their ridiculous “Climate Change Act in 2010, we have had colder and colder winters with snow earlier and earlier. This year the first week of October!!!

  3. The real story here is that there hasn’t been a named storm in the Atlantic since Nadine on Sept 11th. The peak of the Atlantic season is Sept 10th. This in a non El Nino year.

  4. Isn’t it time for that thing to move on. Like over the Iberian Peninsula. I’ve heard that Spain because of “global warming/climate change” as correctly predicted by computer models has had such a dry summer.
    And that the models have predicted that Spain soon is going to look like Sahara.

  5. We already know global warming means more zombies, but we didn’t know that also meant more zombie storms.
    /sarc

  6. Per Strandberg (@LittleIceAge) says:
    I’ve heard that Spain because of “global warming/climate change” as correctly predicted by computer models has had such a dry summer.
    And that the models have predicted that Spain soon is going to look like Sahara.

    Yet there were torrential rains in the south of Spain this weekend, leaving at least 10 people dead..

  7. Yet there were torrential rains in the south of Spain this weekend, leaving at least 10 people dead..
    More of that CAGW weird weather. The wettest droughts in recorded history. You have to admit it’s pretty weird… That they think we’ll fall for it.

  8. Now how the heck did they know about Ginger in 1971? I was under the impression that no weather occurred prior to satellites?

  9. I recall a tropical cyclone a few years ago that initially developed in the eastern Pacific, around Baja California and slowly made its way into the western Pacific and eventually become a typhoon. Usually those things die out soon after they develop or drift northeastward and end up drenching Arizona.

  10. Sparks says:
    “It will last for hundreds of years and become known as ‘Earths Great Red Spot’.”

    I would like to know if there is an explanation encompassing atmospheric vortices on a wide ranging scale from little dust devils in plowed fields all the way up to the eye of Jupiter. Although there are different contributing factors that spawn these vortices, they seem to appear at exponentially related intervals of size and times of duration. For example:
    typical widths and durations for atmospheric vortices
    1. Dust devils: meters, minutes
    2. Tornadoes: tens of meters, hours
    3. Hurricanes: hundreds of thousands of meters, days
    4. Eye of Jupiter: tens of millions of meters, centuries
    Does angular momentum have anything to do with this relation between size and duration?

    And then there are non-atmospheric ‘votices’ like spiral galaxies which are light years across and last for aeons.

  11. RE: “Justthinkin says:
    September 30, 2012 at 11:58 am
    Now how the heck did they know about Ginger in 1971? I was under the impression that no weather occurred prior to satellites?”

    Hey! You’re making me feel like a fossil! There were satellites in 1971! True, they were made of stone and powered by wind, but we had them!

    I remember 1971. Ginger headed out to sea, and, after a chunk of Ginger spun up as Heidi and passed Cape Cod, I was ready to sail south, Boston to Nassau, when Ginger herself turned around and came back east into Hatteras. Didn’t get started until October 3, and even then there was a lot of rain and pea soup fog, as what was left of Ginger headed back out from Harraras.

    There were experiments with rockets taking pictures of earth as far back as 1954. The first year hurricanes were pictured was 1961, and Ester was the first hurricane “discovered” by a satellite.
    History at:

    http://history.nasa.gov/SP-168/section1.htm

  12. The storm has been there this long, and no one has tried to kill it off by cloud seeding or some other method? I thought the CAGW-pushers were warning about the more-intense storms to come, someday. They want the world to spend trillions of dollars to control CO₂, with billions for wind and solar, will blow millions for “ocean iron fertilization” tests, but no one can find a hundred thousand or so to spray at least a part of this storm with something to see if it knocks it down a bit?

  13. noaaprogrammer says:
    September 30, 2012 at 1:36 pm

    “I would like to know if there is an explanation encompassing atmospheric vortices on a wide ranging scale from little dust devils in plowed fields all the way up to the eye of Jupiter.”

    The Continuum mechanics would deal with the vortex depending on what the vortex is formed of i.e. solids, fluid or gases etc.. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Continuum_mechanics
    Which is the easy part, fairly straight forward modeling can be done on a computer.

    Special relativity is used for momentum http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Momentum
    Newton’s law of gravity is used to work out the planetary mass (which is needed to work out the mass of the vortex ) http://www.ajdesigner.com/phpgravity/newtons_law_gravity_equation_force.php
    And to scale all that mass up, exponential sequences are used http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wheat_and_chessboard_problem
    And a Geometric series is used for time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geometric_series.

    “they seem to appear at exponentially related intervals of size and times of duration.”
    Correct: they are exponentially related.

    “Does angular momentum have anything to do with this relation between size and duration?”
    Yes, angular momentum (energy) x (mass) equals duration (time).
    Angular momentum slows down in time as the scale of mass goes up.

    It’s all relative…

    http://www.ajdesigner.com/phpgravity/newtons_law_gravity_equation_force.php

    http://www.phys.unsw.edu.au/einsteinlight/jw/module6_Planck.htm

    http://www.sparknotes.com/testprep/books/sat2/physics/chapter10section6.rhtml

  14. 1) Nadine is caught in the “horse latitudes” notorious for light steering winds in late summer
    2) There have been no new named storms since sept 5, except nadine. The shut down of the season in line with the MJO coming out of phases 2 and 3 was like clockwork.
    3) no storm has reached hurricane intensity south of 25 north east of 80.. only Ernesto even made it west of 80 west. the ratio of ace north of 25 to south of 25 is a record breaker for THE LACK OF DEEP TROPICAL ACTIVITY
    4) 3 of the storms developed from non tropical origins, and 3 others lasted less than 60 hours.

    What I want to know is where are all these people screaming about the high numbers, (13) at mid season) and the amazing back down. In addition the way the storms are being named, some as I say ham sandwiches in the middle of nowhere means that the hurricane forecaster that wishes to play the name game had better average 2-4 more storms than he believes. I got burned there.

    Its like the tornado hysteria, and now the 3rd shot of record cold ( august snap had 1000 records, sept around 500) going right for the heart of the heat in July. So where are these people now?

    But the ideas that the deep tropics would shut down completely in line with the 400mb research I am doing looks like it bore fruit here, and the tornado season. Granted the activity further north burned me, agains the ace which is now over what I had. . All this being said, get ready, I am already seeing the set up for a true hurricane season next year with real live long tracked storms that we wont have to laugh at.

    1 more thing. consider: close to 50% of the ace came out of 3storms that wandered around out of the deep tropics for a long period of time

    If you really want to see a wild track, Ginger 1971. I still cant believe that track sep6 oct 3 2cnd longest on record IT ACTUALLY CAME BACK AND HIT THE US!

  15. For Justthinkin:

    TIROS-1, the first weather satellite, orbited in April, 1960. It failed to reach its design lifetime of 3 months. TIROS-2 orbited in November, 1960, and lasted just over a year. TIROS-3 overlapped TIROS-2, launching in July, 1961. There were 10 TIROS satellites, up through 1965. By that time, the first of the NIMBUS satellites had orbited (August, 1964).

    About the only advantage of being an “old fart” is that you can tell people you were there.

  16. Chris R. says:

    October 1, 2012 at 10:04 am

    For Justthinkin:

    TIROS-1, the first weather satellite, orbited in April, 1960. It failed to reach its design lifetime of 3 months. TIROS-2 orbited in November, 1960, and lasted just over a year. TIROS-3 overlapped TIROS-2, launching in July, 1961. There were 10 TIROS satellites, up through 1965. By that time, the first of the NIMBUS satellites had orbited (August, 1964).

    About the only advantage of being an “old fart” is that you can tell people you were there.

    Thanks oir the info,Chris R .And you do not want to know what was orbitng my diaper bound butt in ’64

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