Open Thread Tuesday

Traveling today. Moderators feel free to post any breaking news items.

About these ads
This entry was posted in Open Thread. Bookmark the permalink.

54 Responses to Open Thread Tuesday

  1. I know it’s weather and not climate but today it snowed in all 9 Provinces of South Africa for the first time that ŵe know of!

  2. Take a vacation with your wife, Anthony.

  3. Bill Gannon says:

    While perusing the inter-web thingy I happened on a article titled “The Lynching of carbon dioxide”. one of the main paragraphs states______“Temperature changes are causing the CO2 changes and not the reverse. As oceans warm, they emit CO2, and as they cool they absorb it.”

    http://iceagenow.info/2012/08/lynching-carbon-dioxide/

  4. Rogelio Escobar says:

    In fairness to the alarmists you should post this frightening graph from DMI ice
    http://ocean.dmi.dk/arctic/icecover.uk.php
    They will love it! but dont shoe antarctic ice (above anomaly)
    looks like NH ice will go below 2007 (but in a history of 1000 years means nthing but you can bet they wi drum this as hard as they can with MSM etc

  5. Ian H says:

    Three typhoons in the space of a week. Damrey, Saola and now Haikui. 23 dead and 9 missing. 200,000 people evacuated from Shanghai. Imagine the uproar in the climate blogosphere if this was hurricanes in the US. The climate debate is clearly mostly a US phenomenon. People in the US often have trouble noticing what is going on in the rest of the world.

  6. kim says:

    The Bish has Part II of Bernie Lewin’s portrait of the betrayal of science at Madrid, 1995.
    =====================

  7. Smokey says:

    Gibson Guitar update.

  8. Louis Hooffstetter says:

    Here’s something cool. Forgive me if part or all of this has already been posted in previous threads:

    1.) Nuclear fission in the earths core has been proposed since 1993:
    http://www.nuclearplanet.com/Herndon%20JGG93.pdf

    2.) It has been documented in relatively shallow rocks in Gabon, W. Africa:
    http://www.physics.isu.edu/radinf/Files/Okloreactor.pdf

    3.) Last year it was confirmed to be occurring within the earth (and accounts for at least 1/2 the heat):
    http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/observations/2011/07/18/nuclear-fission-confirmed-as-source-of-more-than-half-of-earths-heat/

    4.) And it may explain abiogenic oil:
    http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/28111

  9. John F. Hultquist says:

    The WSJ has an opinion article by Fred Krupp, president of the Environmental Defense Fund. One of the many blunders in this inept piece is this: [my bold]
    . . . Berkeley physicist Richard Muller (also a climate skeptic) confirmed that temperatures have been climbing over the past five decades.

    At 2:46 P.M. PST there are 828 comments.

    [Moderator's Note: The article John is referring to is here. -REP]

  10. Eric Webb says:

    Joe Bastardi thinks that the typhoons in the western pacific striking Asia show correlation with what’s to come later for the east coast, like what happened in the 50s. I can agree with that. GFS model has performed outstanding this hurricane season and has nailed Debby and now Ernesto. GFS has been consistent on the wave about to leave Africa becoming a tropical system no later than this weekend. It has shown it being a long track storm may try to close in on the eastern seaboard towards late August. You know if that happens Mckibben, Hansen, Mann, and Gore will be out in full force screaming AGW, and the (mainstream liberal) media will have a field day.

  11. Curiousgeorge says:

    @ Smokey says:
    August 7, 2012 at 2:41 pm

    Gibson Guitar update.
    ***************************************************************
    Thanks for that. I’ve been following this for a couple years. Gibson got screwed royally. You wouldn’t believe the damper this has put on fine woodworking nationwide. Every woodworker I know that uses exotic woods has been looking over their shoulder expecting some SWAT team to raid their one man shop and confiscate their stock, even if they’ve had it for decades. The Lacey act is nothing less than a license to steal from hardworking and talented people.

  12. James from Arding says:

    Just had a look at the site meter for WUWT…
    http://www.sitemeter.com/?a=stats&s=s36wattsup

    hey folks we can watch the approach of 100,000,000 page views! :-)

    [REPLY: Interesting. WordPress shows us with 122.5 million views... but the devil, of course is in the details. According to the WordPress statistics, we've had well in excess of three quarters of a million comments, almost 7600 posts, and a shade over 5300 twitter followers. Today's top author was Anthony Watts, with, so far, 26000 views. I've had 83.
    :>(
    For anyone interested, the WUWT East Coaster's picnic is still accepting attendance requests here. -REP]

  13. eyesonu says:

    Smokey says:
    August 7, 2012 at 2:41 pm

    Gibson Guitar update
    =====================
    I read a previous article on this but don’t remember where to provide the link.

    Please provide link to the original article for background for those reading the update.

    No explanation or discussion is required on this issue. It tells all you need to know.

  14. mfo says:

    Unseen Science
    The gold standard of science publishing is the Scientific Citation Index Expanded or SCIE, owned by Thomson Reuters. However it covers only a small percentage of all scientific literature.

    “In a recent study we counted more than 15,000 scientific periodicals among the ‘BRIC’ countries (Brazil, Russia, India and China), of which just 495 — about 3 per cent — are listed in SCIE. [1]

    “Amazingly, this is not an anomaly: we found that SCIE lists only about 3 per cent of journals for most scientifically advanced countries.

    “This means that decision makers anywhere in the world relying on SCIE (or its cousins, Scopus or perhaps Google Scholar) do not account for, access, or compare as much as 90 per cent of scientific output — works we call “unseen science”.

    “The first step towards any global assessment should be an inventory of the various types of scientific outputs and their sources. There are many possible configurations — for example, electronic only or electronic and paper; frequency of publication; how many places the same article is published (pre- and post-publication); links to supporting data; open source or subscription; editor or peer reviewed.

    “A move towards standard terms for types of outputs would help analysts make accurate counts, and policymakers to use all available information in decision making.

    “Inclusion may require that regional or national governments, or perhaps academies of science, invest in good accounting and a national library of all scientific periodicals — which must be open access — such as Russia is attempting at elibrary.ru.”
    http://www.scidev.net/en/latin-america-and-caribbean/opinions/uncovering-the-world-s-unseen-science.html

  15. Smokey says:

    eyesonu,

    Did a search, here is some info. Lots of links in it.

  16. eyesonu says:

    kim says:
    August 7, 2012 at 2:30 pm

    The Bish has Part II of Bernie Lewin’s portrait of the betrayal of science at Madrid, 1995.
    =======================

    Be sure to read all of part 1. Kind of a long read but the second half of part 1 shows how it all started. Well actually it wasn’t how it started, it was the tipping point.

    It shows the ugly beginning of something much more ugly.

    http://enthusiasmscepticismscience.wordpress.com/2012/08/07/madrid-1995-the-last-day-of-climate-science/#more-820

  17. John F. Hultquist August 7, 2012 at 2:50 pm

    Follow the link to the Krupp OpEd. It is quite a train wreck

  18. John Ratcliffe says:

    With sadness I pass on reports of the death at age 98 of Sir Bernard Lovell, the designer? and head of the team that instigated the Jodrell Bank Radio Telescope for University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology. The passing of one of the great Scientists and Engineers. This planet is now a poorer place.
    Condolences to his family and former colleagues.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-19164236

    johnr

  19. Curiousgeorge says:

    @ eyesonu says:
    August 7, 2012 at 3:54 pm
    ******************************************************
    RE: Gibson story;

    More info here also (vote to amend Lacey cancelled by House (HR 3210 ): http://www.woodworkingnetwork.com/news/woodworking-industry-news/No-RELIEF-Lacey-Act-Vote-Cancelled-163855586.html

    Here’s the USDA Primer about the Act: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/plant_health/lacey_act/downloads/LaceyActPrimer.pdf .

    There’s a lot of hits for this story if you Google “Lacey Act” or Gibson Guitar .

  20. RE: WSJ Frupp article.

    I posted comment #83 (3rd on page 9). I copied it over to Tips. As this is an open thread and the Frupp article is mentioned upthread, I’ll post the comment here with formatting and links.

    ————————————————
    There is so much deception in this article.

    Muller never was a global warming skeptic. He was a believer that fossil fuel would lead to global warming back in the 80s when he resigned from the Sierra Club over their opposition to nuclear power.

    Muller’s BEST study cannot decern a Urban Heat Island signature in the data. This despite the fact that most thermometers are buried in growing urban areas. Occams Razor tells me the simplest answer is that BEST is not capable of finding UHI or doesn’t want to. I have been skeptical of BEST’s approach since April 2011 based upon Fourier Analysis theory – they destroy critical low frequency in temperature records by cutting up long records into shorter ones. There is a fundamental loss of information in the process. I don’t trust it.

    Krupps asks whether we can agree:
    Dramatic Alterations to Climate are here…. No. this year is not as bad as 1988 to name one.
    are likely to get worse…. No. Hurricanes and tornados are down, just to name two things.
    with profound damage to the economy…. No. and no worse than the cure anyway.
    unless sustained action is taken…. Well that depends upon the action doesn’t it?

    \\ Economist recently editorialized about the melting Arctic…//
    Like THAT will persuade me? Mr. Krupp, you or the EDF didn’t have anything to do with that editorial, did you? [Like Scientific American, it is a shame what has become of the Economist].

    In short, I and most of my friends will not agree to these points. Nice Try. Stating falsehoods a fact is an old trick, but we’re on to you. Can’t believe Krupps view of Muller. Can’t believe BEST.

    \\ one of the hallmarks of modern conservatism is to try to see the world as it is //
    Why thank you, Mr. Krupp.
    And I see that you are trying to pull a fast one.

    ——————————————————————–

  21. eyesonu says:

    Smokey

    1, 9, 21, 27

  22. davidmhoffer says:

    Given my recent attempt at a discussion of science with Eric Grimsrud, PhD in chemistry and a cagw alarmist, 6 hit the mark. Humorous and sad all at the same time because as funny as it seems, that is EXACTLY what arguing with the guy was like.

  23. Here is a tinypic link to the a graph of Mississippi River Gage at New Madrid, MO for the period 1970 to 2012. See rivergages.com for the source.
    It was meant to be a link to the “this year is not as bad as 1988” in the reply to Frupp comment above.

    The low point of the river today in this ‘crisis’ not as low as other times such as 1988 (when Hansen testified before Wirth) and 2000 to 2008.

    More importantly, look at the trend of the lows from the ‘crisis’ of 1988 to 1994. I don’t recall anyone being alarmed at “climate change” where the low water point was unusually high.

    Oh, look! Some of the low water points at New Madrid for years 2000, 2001, 2003 happened in January. Could it have been too cold?

  24. Louis Hooffstetter says:

    Smokey

    Take good care of yourself. You make our day on a regular basis.

  25. Jimmy Haigh says:

    Louis Hooffstetter says:
    August 7, 2012 at 5:12 pm

    “Smokey
    Take good care of yourself. You make our day on a regular basis.”

    Seconded!

  26. Anthony Scalzi says:

    Re click 24,

    it looks like someone finally invented a safer alternative to DHMO.

  27. tom s says:

    In Mn where I live we had a big rain and flash flood in northern MN, namely the Duluth area in June of this year you may have heard. Of course the headlines or at least some news stories tried to play the Global Warming card. For the record I’ve been in the meteorology field for 25yrs now.
    Well one of the stories had the headline;

    Duluth eyes rebuilding for a wetter climate
    • Article by: BILL McAULIFFE , Star Tribune
    • Updated: June 25, 2012 – 5:59 AM
    City may be one of the first to design for big downpours.

    This caught my attention of course as the ol’ global warming/climate change ruse was being thrust upon us one more time. There was a quote in the story from Mark Seeley, State Climatologist for MN. His quote was as follows;
    “”There is very little dispute among climate scientists that we’re seeing a higher frequency of these extreme rainfall events, but not necessarily in the same parts of the state,” said climatologist Mark Seeley, a professor at the University of Minnesota. “They move around.”

    Oh yes, his quote contained the ever so popular “very little dispute among climate scientists that”…yadda yadda clause so common in smug climatolgist circles. And his quote of describing how extreme’s ‘move around’. Well duh?!

    So in any event I wanted answers about extreme rainfall events in MN so I went to Seeley’s own page (a wealth of local MN data) and directly to a section pertaining to extreme rain/flash flood events in MN and found a 41yr history on ‘flash flood/heavy rain events’ in MN since 1970. I added up each one of these events per year and produced a plot the ran a trend to see if these types of events were ‘increasing’. The trendline was absolutely flat. No trend in 40yrs of data. I then plotted Duluth’s monthly precip trends since the 1950s…4 months trended positive, 4 months negative and 2 months flat. The magnitude of the pos and neg trends about cancelled eachother out resulting in virtually no trend in DLH for nearly 60yrs. And the months that were trending negatively were the spring/summer which is where you’d most likely find the flash-flood events.

    So not only has there been no trend in flash-flood events in MN these past 41yrs there has been no trend locally in Duluth’s monthly/annual precip, right there on Marky Seeleys own webpage (a good one at that!) The data is in direct conflict with Mark Seeley’s statement he made to the press. I have written to his Climate Office email twice now for a clarification; there has been no response. I will try a third time. I have emailed him before and he’s responded about neutral things in the past but is afraid to talk to me now it appears . I also know the assistant State Climatologist personally and will likely follow up with him if Seeley doesn’t respond.

    There is no room for dishonest Alarmism and this is a classic case. And Seeley is showing his true colors by not responding to me. I was not confrontational in my email and simply layed out my concern and asked for a clarification….(chirp chirp chirp chirp)…

  28. tom s says:

    Dang it….it was 5mo pos 5mo neg and 2mo flat in the Duluth rainfall data…so sorry.

  29. Judy F. says:

    @Smokey,

    I wonder who the Mann is who posed for the picture in #30? Maybe climate science doesn’t pay so well after all…

    sarc/ if necessary

  30. Werner Brozek says:

    Some updates:
    UAH went down from 0.369 to 0.28 from June to July.
    RSS went down from 0.339 to 0.292 from June to July.
    The ENSO Index went down from +0.69 to +0.63 over the past week.

  31. jaycurrie says:

    Yikes…thunderstorm in Victoria BC.

    Just like two weeks ago.

    Global warming…yup, that’s it. I’ll run over to UVic and see what Dr. Weaver has to say.

  32. A. Scott says:

    Here is an interesting page:

    http://www.justfacts.com/globalwarming.asp

    Haven’t spent enough time there to know if it really is Just the Facts

  33. Tom in Texas says:

    Mitt’s Plan
    As president, Mitt Romney will make every effort to safeguard the environment, but he will be mindful at every step of also protecting the jobs of American workers. This will require putting conservative principles into action.

    Significant Regulatory Reform

    The first step will be a rational and streamlined approach to regulation, which would facilitate rapid progress in the development of our domestic reserves of oil and natural gas and allow for further investment in nuclear power.
    •Establish fixed timetables for all resource development approvals
    •Create one-stop shop to streamline permitting process for approval of common activities
    •Implement fast-track procedures for companies with established safety records to conduct pre-approved activities in pre-approved areas
    •Ensure that environmental laws properly account for cost in regulatory process
    •Amend Clean Air Act to exclude carbon dioxide from its purview
    •Expand NRC capabilities for approval of additional nuclear reactor designs
    •Streamline NRC processes to ensure that licensing decisions for reactors on or adjacent to approved sites, using approved designs, are complete within two years

    Increasing Production

    The United States is blessed with a cornucopia of carbon-based energy resources. Developing them has been a pathway to prosperity for the nation in the past and offers similar promise for the future.
    •Conduct comprehensive survey of America’s energy reserves
    •Open America’s energy reserves for development
    •Expand opportunities for U.S. resource developers to forge partnerships with neighboring countries
    •Support construction of pipelines to bring Canadian oil to the United States
    •Prevent overregulation of shale gas development and extraction

    Research and Development

    Government has a role to play in innovation in the energy industry. History shows that the United States has moved forward in astonishing ways thanks to national investment in basic research and advanced technology. However, we should not be in the business of steering investment toward particular politically favored approaches. That is a recipe for both time and money wasted on projects that do not bring us dividends. The failure of windmills and solar plants to become economically viable or make a significant contribution to our energy supply is a prime example.
    •Concentrate alternative energy funding on basic research
    •Utilize long-term, apolitical funding mechanisms like ARPA-E for basic research

    As president, Mitt Romney will make every effort to safeguard the environment, but he will be mindful at every step of also protecting the jobs of American workers. This will require putting conservative principles into action.

    Significant Regulatory Reform

    The first step will be a rational and streamlined approach to regulation, which would facilitate rapid progress in the development of our domestic reserves of oil and natural gas and allow for further investment in nuclear power.
    •Establish fixed timetables for all resource development approvals
    •Create one-stop shop to streamline permitting process for approval of common activities
    •Implement fast-track procedures for companies with established safety records to conduct pre-approved activities in pre-approved areas
    •Ensure that environmental laws properly account for cost in regulatory process
    •Amend Clean Air Act to exclude carbon dioxide from its purview
    •Expand NRC capabilities for approval of additional nuclear reactor designs
    •Streamline NRC processes to ensure that licensing decisions for reactors on or adjacent to approved sites, using approved designs, are complete within two years

    Increasing Production

    The United States is blessed with a cornucopia of carbon-based energy resources. Developing them has been a pathway to prosperity for the nation in the past and offers similar promise for the future.
    •Conduct comprehensive survey of America’s energy reserves
    •Open America’s energy reserves for development
    •Expand opportunities for U.S. resource developers to forge partnerships with neighboring countries
    •Support construction of pipelines to bring Canadian oil to the United States
    •Prevent overregulation of shale gas development and extraction

    Research and Development

    Government has a role to play in innovation in the energy industry. History shows that the United States has moved forward in astonishing ways thanks to national investment in basic research and advanced technology. However, we should not be in the business of steering investment toward particular politically favored approaches. That is a recipe for both time and money wasted on projects that do not bring us dividends. The failure of windmills and solar plants to become economically viable or make a significant contribution to our energy supply is a prime example.
    •Concentrate alternative energy funding on basic research
    •Utilize long-term, apolitical funding mechanisms like ARPA-E for basic research

  34. AlexS says:

    I think it should have been open thread Thursday and not Tuesday….. :)

  35. H.R. says:

    click 35 Now that’s something you don’t see every day.

  36. Sean says:

    Peer review according to NOAA: James Hansen’s latest paper is “flawed scientifically.”

    http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2012/08/07/climate-change-role-in-heat-waves-still-under-debate/

    Also according to Martin Hoerling, a research meteorologist at NOAA: “The weather patterns responsible for most of today’s heat waves would have happened regardless of human-induced climate change,”

  37. dp says:

    This past week in Seattle we’ve had a few days of very high temperatures (90′s) and clear blue bright sunny skies. Humidity was low so it wasn’t smothering heat. Perfect for Seafair, the Blue Angles, and the hydroplane races. Today the atmosphere was filled with green house gas (clouds, fog) and the sun was nowhere to be seen. The green house gas produced temperatures in the high 60′s. Very comfortable. But that is not how it is supposed to work. The models say with all these green house gases we should be dropping dead. What has actually happened is the way skeptics say it works. Watts a guy to believe – bat crap crazy agenda driven PNS nutters or what we see outside the window?

  38. Tom in Texas says:

    I guess I liked Mitt’s energy platform so much, I subconsciously hit “paste” twice. Sorry.

  39. Galane says:

    Weather computer design proposal, circa 1975. http://hackaday.com/2012/08/07/retrotechtacular-simulating-weather-patterns-with-a-logic-chip-computer/

    210,000 TTL logic chips, 90 kilowatts, $10M (in 2012 dollars), roughly 100 times the computing ability of the IBM 360/95. The design is available to download as a PDF so it may be possible to write a simulation to run on current operating systems.

    It would be interesting to have a simulation/emulation of that computer to see how it compares to current systems used for modeling weather.

  40. geran says:

    (Thanks smokey, enjoy the links.)

    I heard a good one this week. How to we get rid of all the corrupt politicians and judges?

    We pay them more…..

  41. Roger Carr says:

    I could have done without your Gibson Guitar update. Smokey. Spoils a good day.

  42. Werner Brozek says:

    CNN has an article: How a global warming skeptic came to change his mind
    http://globalpublicsquare.blogs.cnn.com/2012/08/07/how-a-global-warming-skeptic-came-to-change-his-mind/
    You know who that is about!

    I added my 2 bits worth:

    “According to satellite data by RSS, the slope for the last 15 years and 8 months is flat, meaning there has been no global warming according to RSS since December 1996. Check it out for yourself at:
    http://www.woodfortrees.org/plot/rss/from:1995/plot/rss/from:1996.9/trend

  43. Smokey says:

    A breath of fresh air:

    http://pjmedia.com/blog/climate-catastrophe-or-media-hype/?singlepage=true

    And sorry Roger Carr. Here it is from another point of vire:

    http://moonbattery.com/?p=15357

  44. Bob says:

    So, how is the paper coming, Anthony?

  45. Roger Carr says:

    Smokey... (“And sorry Roger Carr. Here it is from another point of vire:”) that’s the same link you posted before. The one that spoiled my day. However, point of vire has lifted my spirits some.

    vire. A light breeze or the small, disappearing waves on top of water produced by a breeze.

    As in shootin’ the breeze?

  46. Jim says:

    Record cold and snow in South Africa. Still waiting on the Team Hockey Stick to explain this.

  47. Did you happen to notice the arctic cyclonic storm has been going on for 48 hours now? worthy of a story! ice has been dropping like crazy

    [REPLY: The recently posted Sea Ice News thread would be a good place to discuss it. Not sure we have enough good information on it yet to make a post. -REP]

  48. Kelvin Vaughan says:

    Brilliant! Makes one proud to be British

    After having dug to a depth of 10 feet last year, Canadian scientists
    found traces of copper wire dating back 200 years and came to the
    conclusion that their ancestors already had a telephone network more
    than 150 years ago.

    Not to be outdone by their neighbours, in the weeks that followed, an
    American archaeologist dug to a depth of 20 feet, and shortly after, a
    story published in the New York Times:
    “American archaeologists, finding traces of 250-year-old copper wire,
    have concluded that their ancestors already had an advanced high-tech
    communications network 50 years earlier than the Canadians”.

    One week later, the British authorities reported the following:
    “After digging as deep as 30 feet in North Yorkshire , Jack Arkwright,
    a self-taught archaeologist, reported that he found absolutely bugger all.

    Jack has therefore concluded that 250 years ago, Britain had already
    gone wireless.”

  49. godlygeorge says:

    Daniel here again. dont know why it uses my username to post. but here is a good article about the storm. http://neven1.typepad.com/blog/2012/08/arctic-storm-part-3-detachment.html#more

  50. Ed Mertin says:

    [SNIP: Sorry, Ed, but this is just too overtly political, even for an open thread. -REP]

Comments are closed.