Some stuff I’ve been up to…Cellular Weather Station

As many people know, weather stations are my specialty. I’ve been busy with inventing a number of things as of late, trying to stay competitive. So thought I’d drop this out there in case anyone has a use for either of these new solar powered weather station systems mentioned below. The US Fish and Wildlife Service just bought one of these for a special project to monitor the weather long term at a sensitive wildlife area. Nothing else would do the job for them. The software is off the shelf, but the system design and production is of my own design.


New Solar Powered Cellular Weather Station allows you to put weather data online from almost anywhere.

Full featured weather monitoring capability, supports all basic weather data, plus can be expanded for additional data such as solar radiation, evapo-transpiration, etc. Uses the rugged Vantage Pro2 and Vantage Pro2 Plus cabled models. Includes iPhone and Android apps.

Guaranteed compatibility with 3G/4G cellular networks in the USA plus international cellular networks including Canada and the UK

The Cellular Weather Station Features:

  • Full featured weather monitoring capability, supports all basic weather data, plus can be expanded for additional data such as solar radiation, evapo-transpiration, etc. Uses the rugged Vantage Pro2 and Vantage Pro2 Plus cabled models.
  • Guaranteed compatibility with 3G/4G cellular networks supported in this list. Supports international cellular networks including Canada and the UK.
  • Dual panel solar power battery system will power weather station and transceiver for up to 4 days in total darkness.
  • A complete ready to run weather station web page showing the most recent data, plus automatic data archiving.
  • No FCC license is required to use these stations.
  • Plug and Play operation. No specialized setup or tuning is required to establish the cellular data link.
  • All system electronics come pre-assembled in a NEMA rated weatherproof case with o-ring seal and locking hardware. Includes internal electronics ambient temperature monitor that reports automatically with other data.
  • Ruggedized high quality construction – designed to withstand harsh remote environments.
  • Modular design allows for easy shipping and transport.
  • Complete systems with a weather station include WeatherView32 Professional weather monitoring software for additional data logging, web output, report generation, and alerting via email, pager, cell phone when weather conditions exceed levels you specify.
  • iPhone and Android weather data display apps included
  • Comes with guy wire kit for stability

The system includes a LIVE WEATHER WEB PAGE with automatic data logging that you can check from anywhere.

Setup and view on any computer, PC/Mac/Linux/Android/iPhone and post your weather data directly to the Internet without a dedicated always on PC. Once the CWS is operating, within minutes, you’ll be able to see your weather data live on the Internet.

Data display features:

  • Selectable data logging intervals from 1 minute to hours.
  • Automatically upload data to third-party weather sites including CWOP, the GLOBE Program, and Weather Underground..
  • Download the data to your PC for all the powerful charting, graphing, and analysis.
  • Apps for iPhone and Android monitoring included
  • Add extra user license kit to download the data independently to multiple PCs—ideal for schools, agriculture, scientific fieldwork, and remote locations.

See the full details on the Cellular Weather Station

The CWS complements our Solar powered Long Range Wireless Stations – with point to point range up to 30 miles. See the details


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60 thoughts on “Some stuff I’ve been up to…Cellular Weather Station

  1. Only thing I’d miss for a long term deployment would be monitoring for the battery state (charge level and an alert when it is recommended to swap it out due to aging). Very nice kit otherwise.

  2. Looks great, can we get a version without the tripod? It looks like a stiff wind would knock it over.

    Maybe a stake in the ground and a fitting to mount it to the stake.

    • Way ahead of you – we supply a guy wire kit standard…but we can also supply these sans poles, guy, and tripod for mounting to your own fixtures

  3. Another observation, does the heat generated by the dark solar cells effect the readings?

  4. John from CA says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:03 am

    Looks great, can we get a version without the tripod? It looks like a stiff wind would knock it over.

    Thats probably why it “Comes with guy wire kit for stability.”

  5. What – not coal powered?

    How have you compensated for the rising heat from the solar panels – surely as bad as tarmac? Solar panels are designed to absorb as much solar as possible and convert less than 40% to electricity leaving the rest as heat!

    [Moderator’s Note: jj, you are still posting using an anonymous proxy server. Please check our policy page here. You have been commenting here as “Bob Gaddrod”, “Joe Priestleigh”, “Cameron Taylor”, “Lincoln Sparrow”, “R Kcin”, “Marcella Twixt”, “Evangeline Maergulis”, “Jphilips”, and “John Majikthise”, amongst others. One would think that UofG would keep you too busy for this sort of childishness. Reform or be snipped. -REP]

  6. What does the kit weight?

    If it can be back packed to remote hiking locations in Sequoia, Kings Canyon, Yosemite National Parks etc. then it could serve weather information and as an emergency call station where cell coverage is nonexistent.

    Pretty cleaver, a closed loop regional weather system that climate models can’t screw up.

  7. RTD or Thermistor?
    What is your recommended calibration interval?
    Will you have bearing kits for the anemometer?
    Batteries? Rechargeable lithium?

  8. GeoLurking says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:08 am
    =======
    Good point, I missed the “Comes with guy wire kit for stability” bullet point.

    I’m not being critical, its very cleaver.

    Tripod base would be better if the cross supports were at ground level were they could be staked into the ground which would also allow the vertical support to be supported at ground level.

  9. FYI, the page you linked to for the list of 3G/4G carriers has a couple of issues – there was server-side ASP code appearing in the header and footer, and “too allow” should be “to allow” in the first paragraph.

  10. That is awesome. If I had an extra 4-grand lying around I’d put one in the backyard so I could check my weather on the internet!
    And looking at the equipment you have at weathershop, a person could actually do a residential setup much cheaper. Really neat stuff Anthony.

  11. Anthony has provided a cool way for individuals to engage in the study of weather. Why are you anti-science JJ?

  12. Very nice setup there! Enough isolated farms all over the world and hooked into the internet linked WUWTGCN and we’d all be set for some real turkey. Wouldn’t it be great to have an real time hourly updated global average, actual temperature now, no anomalies, across the entire world. One large government could put that into existence on what they spill in a few days to “green” environmentalists.

    But when you say “■ Dual panel solar power battery system will power weather station and transceiver for up to 4 days in total darkness.” lets all hope ol’ Sol never tests that for you. ☺

  13. I’ll add it to my list of applications for which current PV technology is price-competitive against the alternatives. Admittedly, it is not a large niche in the electricity market.

    ;-)

  14. You have been commenting here as “Bob Gaddrod”, “…”, and “John Majikthise”, amongst others.

    Sorry none of these are me. Nor is UofG anything I recognise,
    I thought my post was reasonable – a bit of humour with a real question at the end. I see I am not the only one to question the heat from the panels.

    [REPLY: Sorry, jj, but you really are those others and I’m really surprised that U of G is not anything you recognize since it is probably the largest employer in Cheltenham (oh, and in the event you don’t recognize “Cheltenham”, that is the source of the IP address your first 32 comments on this blog came from before you got stupid with anonymous proxy servers). It really doesn’t matter whether a post is reasonable or not: comments originating from anonymous proxy servers are subject to deletion….. unless of course, the commenter is FOIA. So, jj, you can step out or be snipped. -REP]

  15. Anthony, Are you the WeatherShop? I fly into a remote airstrip and it would be cool to get the current weather for this “private” strip accessing it on the radio – like I can at most other municipal airports. I need to get some other matters in hand first but I seriously might be able to use this. The nearst station is over thirty miles away. I can’t hear it on the ground anyway.

  16. Pamela Gray says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:20 am
    Don’t quite know what a guy wire is, but can I specify the kind of guy I want?
    ===============================================
    As long as he’s wired?

  17. Pamela Gray says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:20 am
    “Don’t quite know what a guy wire is, but can I specify the kind of guy I want?”

    Pamela.
    Retro-guy wire comes only in raw iron: tough, malleable, but work hardens if you try to bend it too many times. Modern guy-wire can be acquired as soft and weak as pure lead or as strong and durable as braided stainless steel. Choose carefully….

    Conversely, gal-wire only comes in silver, gold, or platinum, in my experience.
    MtK

  18. @Rich Tubbs
    > .. If I had an extra 4-grand lying around I’d put one in the backyard …

    You certainly don’t have to spend $4K to have a personal weather station in your back yard, hooked up to the Internet. I did it for less than $500, using the Davis Vantage Vue, the Vantage Pro2′s cheaper little brother (but the same very high quality engineering as the Pro2)

    http://www.weathershop.com/davis_vvue.htm

    My station has been in operation for over a year, sending CWOP reports to NWS every ten minutes which can be monitored over the Internet: http://www.findu.com/cgi-bin/wxpage.cgi?call=AF4EX

    Yes, I’m a ham operator, so my station is registered under my call sign. But you don’t need a ham license to participate in CWOP if you hook your station directly to the Internet via a serial interface.

    The Davis serial interface (WeatherLink) was a bit pricey for me (I was trying to keep the price of the whole station setup under $500). So I built my own serial interface and use some free software (Cumulus) to make the CWOP link:

    http://www.wxforum.net/index.php?topic=10721.0

    I’ve learned a lot about meteorology by running my own weather station, and derive a satisfaction knowing that my reports are actually used by NWS/NOAA for mesoscale forecasting.

    There is a free web site, mesowest.utah.edu, run by the Unversity of Utah, which provides an interactive geo-spatial map interface to all of the mesonets, including CWOP. I monitor it all the time to track winds, rain, fires and hurriscanes. And of course, to see my little station chugging out its reports, 24/7.
    http://mesowest.utah.edu/cgi-bin/droman/my_login.cgi?came_from=/cgi-bin/droman/mesomap.cgi?profile_id=iugN8K5281JtjXS [Click on "View profile without logging in" to see my station situated in the Florida east-coast CWOP mesonet]

    Mesoscale forecasting reports on a much smaller scale than your typical weather.com synoptic forecasts, ideally down to a kilometer or so. So there’s a great need to for additional stations to populate the meso networks.

    I think Anthony’s kit above is a very cost-effective way for weather organizations (academic, govt etc) to increase the number of stations with very good data and minimal overhead.

    :-|

  19. Rich Tubbs says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:57 am

    That is awesome. If I had an extra 4-grand lying around I’d put one in the backyard so I could check my weather on the internet!
    ___________________________________
    I just wish I had the extra 4-grand lying around too so I could put one in my pasture. I am near a rural airport ~ 3 miles and it would be interesting to track the difference between my pasture and the airport as it expands as it keeps on doing.

  20. I know a couple of PERFECT places for such a station to do real climate monitoring. One is in the middle of the Black Rock Desert. NOTHING changes for miles around for hundreds of years and they now have cellular service in Gerlach (except maybe during Burning Man when the cell site would be flooded). That would be a perfect place and even if you had to move the station a mile at some point the conditions wouldn’t change. It would need strong guys, though, as winds can easily reach 70MPH and it can be extremely dusty with flour fine dust.

  21. Anthony,
    A technical question: The accessories list for the Vantage Pro2 lists “a patented solar-powered 24-hour fan-aspirated radiation shield for maximum accuracy of temperature and humidity
    readings”. What is the accuracy, with/without, for temp and humidity measurements?
    Thanks!
    MtK

  22. If you could add a vocalization unit, and a transmitter interface it might be usable as an AWOS for a small airport.

  23. Anthony, if you are hoping to sell your unit here in Australia and I see a market, be aware that solar powered relay stations commonly used here to provide telephone services in remote areas drop out after 5 or 6 days of heavy cloud cover. So you might look into additional battery backup.

  24. John from ca says
    “Another observation, does the heat generated by the dark solar cells effect the readings”

    I suggest you revise your junior high school physics John from CA. Compare the heat sink of solar cells with that of black tarmac. Different ball park. Add to that the positioning of the various component parts, obvious in the photo.

  25. Pamela Gray says:
    June 23, 2012 at 2:35 pm
    “MacTheKnife, I don’t care much for gold, silver or platinum. I prefer brass.”

    Pamela.
    Me too! That’s the difference between my experience and my preference, que lastima!
    MtK

  26. @ColdInOz:

    John from ca says
    “Another observation, does the heat generated by the dark solar cells effect the readings”

    I suggest you revise your junior high school physics John from CA. Compare the heat sink of solar cells with that of black tarmac. Different ball park. Add to that the positioning of the various component parts, obvious in the photo.

    No need to revise the laws of physics. It’s well known that black solar photo-voltaic cells generate heat as well as electricity.

    http://pveducation.org/pvcdrom/modules/heat-generation-in-pv-modules

    So it’s possible that the panel could get just as hot as black tarmac.

    With regard to component parts positioning, it looks like the solar panel is located just inches away from the aspirator for the thermometer. Also, the panel is tilted such that air behind the panel could be heated and rise up close to the aspirator, which might affect the readings. Hopefully the kit could be assembled with the panel further away from the aspirator.

    :-|

    REPLY:
    I hear you, it was a concern with me too. The kit can be assembled any way you want. In our testing, the way it is setup, we have not seen any bias from the solar panel. If it is a concern, the IR shield assembly detaches and can be mounted at any elevation on the pole, or can be mounted on a separate pole. – Anthony

  27. I hope you become rich and famous. You are already famous!

    This country and wealth was built on innovation. Good luck.

    If you will build it outside of California I would like to apply for a job.

  28. Well I think that is an exciting investment, to teach the kids about taking measurements and making observations, and keeping careful records. I really like it. And it would be interesting to compare it with the temp announcements on the local radio stations. Hopefully the better half will agree. I will make my best pitch. (:

    My dream kit would also include infrasound measurements (in particular 2-5 Hz) and would be able to measure changes in the atmospheric efield from about that high off the ground. That would be incredible to measure during storms, or before and after rain. I would love that. And it all would get archived on the computer.

  29. @Anthoney:

    One of my “someday projects” is to get a small recording thermometer set and put one over the driveway, and one over the lawn (and maybe one near the road and one in the back yard under a tree…) All inside 100 feet of each other. Then show exactly how much “microclimate” changes the results. I’m quite sure that “over the tarmac” and “near the road” would be at least a degree warmer than under the tree… But having a direct record of that from matched instruments would be ‘golden’.

    Can you recommend a device for that? At one time I think you had a little recording thermometer thingy for not too much money. Any chance of a “feature” on it, too?

  30. What I need, Anthony, apart from fluency in Portuguese and knowing what Ecotretas is up to these days, (oh, and beautiful girlfriends), is a system I can mount maybe 100 feet from my home (up a tree) and still receive data, either on demand or, preferably, automatically downloaded to my PC.

    WiFi will not allow placement of a personal weather station far enough away from my residence to not be contaminated by the house. Mabe a cable system from the sensors to a wifi node close to my home. A reasonale distance from my home must be 100 feet plus; but I am in a high-denisty suburb, with trees. So it should be mounted atop a tree.

  31. @Robert of Ottawa:
    > … What I need, Anthony, … is a system I can mount
    > maybe 100 feet from my home (up a tree) …

    The Vantage Pro2 (in Anthony’s Celluar Weather Station) and the Vantage Vue both come equipped with a solar powered transmitter with a range of 1000 feet.

    http://www.weathershop.com/davis_vantage_pro2.htm

    http://www.weathershop.com/davis_vvue.htm

    But you don’t want to mount it in a tree. The branches will interfere with rain and wind measurements. Roof mount or on a sturdy mast, with the anemometer preferably about 20 feet above the ground, clear of obstructions.

    But make sure that you have easy access to it, whereever you put it, because you’ll have to replace batteries and clean it every 18 months or so.

  32. Just sharing,

    Central spike anchor, (like a stop sign) to secure and ground the unit.

    Drop the control and battery boxes to the lowest point.

    Use a desulphating solar charger (does it exist?) with lead acid batteries, and you could get 5 years on the batteries.

    Inventions do change the world, no?

  33. I love it!

    How do we WUWTers apply for some of that climate thingy grant money? I’d like to install a small flotilla of those sensors. That is, place a grid of sensors starting from our local town center (where our local temperature measurement sensor is for NOAA) out till sensors are mounted in rural farms and fields. This is a far easier concept to try out with a small country town than trying to grid the large eastern megalopolis centers. Just to see what the UHI ‘is/is not’ for a largely brick town, suburban edges and rural country surrounding.

    I live outside the town in one of the rural areas and have been intrigued to see the local news claiming new record highs the last few years. Especially as when I first moved here we were always within a degree when the temperature was announced. Yeah, I know, my old max/min mercury thermometer just isn’t up to snuff anymore.

    A few million dollars wouldn’t even be a few drops out of the billions the climsci (pronounced like clumsy) group have been spending and it would be for direct observations that avoids models, statistics and corrupt scoundrels.

    It’s a shame these sensors can’t be mounted vertically for a few thousand feet. Then we could test Willis’s theory about weather having a self limiting feedback factor. Belize might be a good place to try that idea out.

  34. Robert of Ottawa says: June 23, 2012 at 5:31 pm
    WiFi will not allow placement of a personal weather station far enough away from my residence to not be contaminated by the house.
    — — —
    The Wi-Fi n protocol has a outdoor range of 820 ft (250m).

  35. Anthony, as a fellow inventor with two issued patents and several pending, let me suggest….”military contracts.” They’d love this!

  36. Looks very nice – it certainly puts my small, dirt cheap supermarket weather station in its place! Anthony, any time you need something like this soak testing in some corner of a foreign field (ok, city) … :-)

    Practical query: Despite the smallness and cheapness of my ‘supermarket grade’ weather station, I’m regularly impressed at how well it manages to forecast the next few hours’ conditions. Does anyone know where I might find some details of the sort of algorithms built into these things? Searching on the net I find mentions of b-i-g all-singing, all-dancing (commercial) programs, but I want quick’n’dirty calculations which will fit either into a PIC (like the supermarket model) or a program small enough for one (very) amateur programmer to work with. Any suggestions gratefully received!

  37. @Steve C
    > Does anyone know where I might find some details of the
    > sort of algorithms built into these things?

    I believe many of these weather boxes (including the Vantage Pro) use variations of the Sager algorithm, which dates from 1942 and was originally implemented on a custom circular slide rule.

    http://www.wxforum.net/index.php?topic=5970.0

    The simplest algorithm of course is: barometer falling = BAD WX, barometer rising=GOOD WX
    :-|

  38. A serious suggestion: for remote locations, you might want to include a level switch so if anything knocks it down, it will immediately send “Help! I’ve fallen and I can’t get up” or some such message.

  39. Well done, Anthony. I have forwarded your post to contacts in the Wide Brown Land (Australia) which is always in need of weather monitors, especially since the BOM started cooking the figures. It’s a snip at the price. Excellent!

    John Day says:
    June 24, 2012 at 4:59 am

    @Steve C
    > Does anyone know where I might find some details of the
    > sort of algorithms built into these things?

    I believe many of these weather boxes (including the Vantage Pro) use variations of the Sager algorithm, which dates from 1942 and was originally implemented on a custom circular slide rule.

    http://www.wxforum.net/index.php?topic=5970.0

    The simplest algorithm of course is: barometer falling = BAD WX, barometer rising=GOOD WX
    :-|
    ——————————————-
    Really, a 1942 algorithm is still widely used? I am not being critical, at all, but do wonder how the newly minted algorithms that currently inform climate models will look in 70 years or so.

    And yep, I have one of the simplest algorithms right in front of me every time I look up. It is a lovely circular barometer/thermometer set in an old piece of fence post. It is interesting that if you look at old movies and even old TV shows, every house had a barometer. But, in modern flats/apartments and houses, both in real life and the media, they are absent.

    Two questions arise. One, where have they all gone? Are our landfills chock full of unloved barometers? And two, does it reflect urbanisation? If you live in a city, the weather matters much less. Maybe our parents only had a barometer out of tradition anyway.

    The combination of my barometer, the local weather maps, and my arthritic knee consistently outperform the BOM forecasts. And I live in a small city. But, weather afficiandos, many of whom inhabit WUWT, are perhaps a bit of a species apart, or tribe.

  40. I was in the Canadian rockies a few days ago, lake Maligne near Jasper, and saw what may be one of Anthony’s new product range – a cellular toilet. On an island in the lake there is a stone-brick toilet with solar panels on the roof, electrically self-sufficient and at 250,000 dollars the most expensive out-house possibly in the world. Looks like a good money-earner! /sarc off

  41. @Johanna
    > Really, a 1942 algorithm is still widely used?
    Probably not used much by professional meteorologists, but seems to be used a lot in the mass-consumption, Walmart-class (and higher, like Davis) weather boxes, which tend to use low-end microprocessors like PIC, where code and data space is very limited.

    The pros use codes like the NCR WRF system (http://wrf-model.org/index.php), which a decade or so ago required a Cray or similar super-computer to run. Home computers are more powerful now, so a reasonably equipped personal computer could run these codes. WRF is free software. You can download it here:

    http://www.mmm.ucar.edu/wrf/users/downloads.html

    … but to requires considerable skill and knowledge of FORTRAN compiling etc to get it running on real data.

    A better alternative for aspiring amateur meteorologists would be to interactive with WRF on line using Joe Murgo’s nifty web page (http://webpages.charter.net/wxjoe/animator.htm) which lets you interact with different weather forecasting models and create animated weather maps. A lot of these models are WRF-based, using state of the art “Data Assimilation” algorithms (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_assimilation), which take prior conditions as baseline and assimilate new observations for predicting future states of the model.

  42. Steve in SC says: “What is your recommended calibration interval?”

    I can’t recall anyone ever discussing calibration intervals. For weather stations in general, especially the ones used to calculate “global warming”, how often are they calibrated, and are the calibration dates recorded with their data? And can we simply ignore weather stations and data that has never been calibrated properly?

  43. I’ve been using Open2300 (http://www.lavrsen.dk/foswiki/bin/view/Open2300/WebHome) on a LaCrosse Ws-2300 for several years now (http://classic.wunderground.com/cgi-bin/findweather/getForecast?query=05341). The station is up on the roof with a 900 Mhz radio to the console.
    Had to mod the source code to filter out errant readings, but that’s why we have access to the source…
    Also built a web page for a Vantage Pro (http://www.swantown-wifi.portolympia.net/), uses a Troy Serial/Ethernet convertor to talk to the remote VWS server. you can also add a very cheap Ubiquiti WiFI link (http://www.ubnt.com/) to extend the range for at least 30 km.

  44. @jaymam:

    Steve in SC says: “What is your recommended calibration interval?”

    I can’t recall anyone ever discussing calibration intervals. For weather stations in general, especially the ones used to calculate “global warming”, how often are they calibrated, and are the calibration dates recorded with their data? And can we simply ignore weather stations and data that has never been calibrated properly?

    I can’t speak for all the weather networks, but for CWOP (Citizen Weather Observation Program) which has about 7,000 stations, the calibration is performed by the network administration and consists of periodic quality control checks, comparing each station’s average performance to nearby stations. Stations which pass the tests are rated “OK” (black dot on MesoWest), those with deficiencies are rated with a “CAUTION” symbol (orange dot), advising that some data may be incorrect. http://www.wxqa.com/aprswxnetqc.html
    Some deficiencies are easily corrected, such as normalizing air pressure to sea level by adjusting an offset parameter. Others, such as equipment malfunction are harder to fix.

    Here’s the last QC report for my station, which has consistently been rated “OK”.

    http://weather.gladstonefamily.net/cgi-bin/wxqchart.pl?site=AU006

    :-|

  45. @John Day – Many thanks for that, John, now I have something to hunt down and get my teeth into. I’m less surprised than some at the age of the algorithm, as it dates it firmly in the Traditional Uncorrupted Science era; better still, if it can fit on a slide rule it will probably fit in a modest memory – electronic or mine!

    And I’m pleased to say that, like Johanna, I have a nice practical implementation of that ‘simplest’ algorithm, which has been doing its thing for darn near as long as the Sager algorithm. Come to think of it, do I need to make a complicated electronic thingy? … :-)

  46. @Steve C
    > … if it can fit on a slide rule it will probably fit in a modest memory

    Yes, the algorithm is seems to be very compact, and doesn’t need many input features.

    http://www.weather-above.com/Sager%20Algorithm.html

    But, the wind “direction change” and “Clouds” feature values it needs aren’t automatically provided by a “standalone” most home weather stations:

    Wind
    Direction=(Calm, N,NE,E,SE,S,SW,W,NW)
    Direction change=(Steady, Backing, Veering)
    Pressure
    Mean Sea Level= inches HG
    Trend = (rising-rapidly, rising-slowly, normal, falling-slowly, falling-rapdily)
    Clouds
    Cover=(Clear,Partly-Cloudy,Mostly-Overcast, Overcast,Rain)

    Backing and veering winds reflect a change in wind direction with altitude, so not clear how a single anemometer could figure that out. Perhaps there’s a heuristic for estimating the advection and rotation from short time series samples. Or maybe one could use the variance of the wind direction as a crude proxy for this.

    Also you would need a solar radiation sensor to infer cloud cover. They’re readily available, but not usually included in the typical home weather station. Again, maybe one could use short term variance in temperature as a proxy for cloud cover.

    In any case, I think I would try to come up with my own algorithm with whatever features my station provided, using local historical forecasts extracted from NOAA archives and time-series or decision-tree modelling tools. (R, Weka etc).

  47. E.M.Smith says:
    June 23, 2012 at 5:24 pm
    @Anthoney:

    One of my “someday projects” is to get a small recording thermometer set and put one over the driveway, and one over the lawn (and maybe one near the road and one in the back yard under a tree…) All inside 100 feet of each other. Then show exactly how much “microclimate” changes the results. I’m quite sure that “over the tarmac” and “near the road” would be at least a degree warmer than under the tree… But having a direct record of that from matched instruments would be ‘golden’.

    Can you recommend a device for that? At one time I think you had a little recording thermometer thingy for not too much money. Any chance of a “feature” on it, too?

    Oregon Scientific has a wireless weather station that you can interogate up to 10 combination temperature /humidity sensors. To do that you have to knock off the other included sendors (barometer, wind, etc). Range is posted as 100m with no obstructions. There is software to download data, but I couldn’t determine from the info if it’s continuous or not.

    http://us.oregonscientific.com/cat-Weather-sub-Professional-Weather-Stations-prod-Pro-Wireless-Weather-Station.html

    For data logging capability:

    http://us.oregonscientific.com/cat-Weather-sub-Professional-Weather-Stations-prod-Professional-Weather-Center.html

  48. John from CA says:
    June 23, 2012 at 11:32 am

    I’m not being critical, its very cleaver.

    The reason you didn’t get a red squiggly from your browser on that is that a cleaver is a food chopper. Not too clever! ;p

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