For you military history buffs – bad karma das boot

Since I spent so much time working with Google Earth for the surfacestations project, I decided to create a blog for fun, where I can practice my sleuthing skills using that great tool. I find aerial photo recon quite fun.

Military history buffs (and movie buffs) surely remember the K-19, Russia’s ill fated first nuclear submarine. I think I found it on Google Earth. Have a look, let me know if you concur. There’s quite an interesting story surrounding it and the movie version of the sub.

K-19′s final stop?

And, be sure to bookmark The Daily Google Earth I’d also appreciate blog links if you are so inclined.

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20 thoughts on “For you military history buffs – bad karma das boot

  1. Here is one that we used to fly over regularly, a russian diamond mine…

    62.457519,113.70944
    Russian Federation, Samarskaya oblast, Mirnyy

  2. In a previous lifetime, I was a civilian staff instructor in the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program. The Thresher seemed to have a similar bad karma about it. But, we sophisticated 21st century intellectuals know that there isn’t any such thing as karma, good or bad.

    Don’t we?

    http://www.navysite.de/ssn/ssn593.htm

    As I recall hearing many years ago, after the loss of the Thresher, Admiral Rickover required ship yard supervisors to go along on submarines for the test dives after an overhaul. As the French would say: “pour l’encouragement des autres”.

    http://home.wxs.nl/~pdavis/Byng.htm

    Regards,

    Steamboat Jack (Jon Jewett’s evil twin)

  3. Anthony:
    Recon these.

    This: (use eye level of 8000 feet)
    Lat/Long 38.265509° 105.949865°

    Is a scale model of This: (use eye level of 140 miles)
    Lat/Long 34.611192° 80.177666°

    The building beside the model are a military training facility.

  4. Check Google Earth at this location:
    77°59’46.30″N = 77.9962N
    39° 4’46.11″W = = 39.0795W

    This is where I spent most of 1967 trying to detect Chinese Atomic Bomb explosions. The ‘official’ position of our instrument [Inge Lehmann station] is actually a little bit off, at 77.9467N 39.1833W [see http://dosfan.lib.uic.edu/acda/ctbtpage/station.pdf ], but I’m not so sure as to how accurate that is.

    REPLY: Top of the Greenland Ice Sheet? That must have been fun – A

  5. Try 41.515189, -71.541339 for an odd shape.

    REPLY: Sorry Gary, I don’t see anything there, just woods. lat/lon typo maybe? – A

  6. What is this? You don’t have enough on your plate with WUWT? Expanding out to WPOTD and TDGE? What is this, a subtle ploy to take over Al Gore’s internet?

    Got to admit that the visual stimulii are a different and pleasing change.

  7. Leif Svalgaard says:
    May 15, 2011 at 11:17 am
    REPLY: Top of the Greenland Ice Sheet? That must have been fun – A
    Try to actually go to that location…

  8. Well good. I look forward to learning all sorts of things I never even knew were interesting, just as I learned to appreciate the nuts and bolts of weather data collecting from your surface stations project long ago. BTW, thanks, Mr Watts, and the amazing commenters, for all the education that pours through this blog.

    I’ve added The Daily Google Earth to Pecan Corner’s blog roll (WUWT is already there) and will mention it in my next little wrap up.

  9. thanks for the article. K19 has been an interest of mine for some time now.

    I remember watching news film of the sub with the crew on deck when this happened. Could not have been a fun experience for the crew.

  10. The film version starring Harrison Ford and Liam Neeson used the old Russian Sub from Tampa Bay where it was a museum. I shot some photos of it as it was being fixed up in Dry Dock.

  11. Jeff Alberts says:
    May 15, 2011 at 12:49 pm

    I don’t think there’s any such thing as “bad” karma (or karma, period, for that matter).

    What if my karma runs over your dogma ?

  12. Ouch. Reading the history of that sub is almost enough to make a person superstitious. No sailor would get on that ship again. Sunk, raised caught on fire is a rather perfect ending. (maybe)

  13. Try 41.515189, -71.541339 for an odd shape.

    REPLY: Sorry Gary, I don’t see anything there, just woods. lat/lon typo maybe? – A

    Oops, yeah, slip of the finger. Should be 41.545189 N and 71.541339 W

    Veteran’s Memorial Cemetery, Exeter, RI

  14. Anthony, How fun! Of the many jobs that I held in the navy, the tour that I did as a Soviet submarine analyst was one of the most fun—maybe because I was a lieutenant living in a beach house in Lanikai. Anyway, if this whole weather/climate thing doesn’t work out for you, I’ll be happy to make the introductions for you at ONI. http://www.oni.navy.mil/Join_Us/types_jobs.htm

  15. “”””” Steamboat Jack says:
    May 15, 2011 at 10:52 am
    In a previous lifetime, I was a civilian staff instructor in the Navy Nuclear Propulsion Program. The Thresher seemed to have a similar bad karma about it. But, we sophisticated 21st century intellectuals know that there isn’t any such thing as karma, good or bad.

    Don’t we?

    http://www.navysite.de/ssn/ssn593.htm

    As I recall hearing many years ago, after the loss of the Thresher, Admiral Rickover required ship yard supervisors to go along on submarines for the test dives after an overhaul. As the French would say: “pour l’encouragement des autres”.

    http://home.wxs.nl/~pdavis/Byng.htm

    Regards,

    Steamboat Jack (Jon Jewett’s evil twin) “””””

    Well Steamer, that sounds like a vartiation on the theme employed when illness fakings slackers are assigned to parachute repacking duty. So after their shift is over, they each get to grab a parachute out of the finished packed bin, and get shoved into a plane for their dive of the day. A self enforcing check on the quality of their workmanship.

  16. “parachute repacking duty……A self enforcing check on the quality of their workmanship.”

    ….or why congressmen should not have a separate medical and retirement plan from the rest of us.

  17. Here is one you can see starting at about 50 mi eye alt. I believe it is a last name.
    30 04′ 48.02″ N, 97 08′ 46.93″ W

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